Cognitive Dissonance

"Democracy! Bah! When I hear that I reach for my feather boa!" - Allen Ginsberg

Posts tagged 1%

260 notes

As more lives and communities are destroyed by the system that creates vast amounts of wealth for the few, the more heroic it sounds to “give back.” It’s what I would call “conscience laundering” — feeling better about accumulating more than any one person could possibly need to live on by sprinkling a little around as an act of charity.

But this just keeps the existing structure of inequality in place. The rich sleep better at night, while others get just enough to keep the pot from boiling over. Nearly every time someone feels better by doing good, on the other side of the world (or street), someone else is further locked into a system that will not allow the true flourishing of his or her nature or the opportunity to live a joyful and fulfilled life.

And with more business-minded folks getting into the act, business principles are trumpeted as an important element to add to the philanthropic sector. I now hear people ask, “what’s the R.O.I.?” when it comes to alleviating human suffering, as if return on investment were the only measure of success. Microlending and financial literacy (now I’m going to upset people who are wonderful folks and a few dear friends) — what is this really about? People will certainly learn how to integrate into our system of debt and repayment with interest. People will rise above making $2 a day to enter our world of goods and services so they can buy more. But doesn’t all this just feed the beast?

I’m really not calling for an end to capitalism; I’m calling for humanism.

Money should be spent trying out concepts that shatter current structures and systems that have turned much of the world into one vast market. Is progress really Wi-Fi on every street corner? No. It’s when no 13-year-old girl on the planet gets sold for sex. But as long as most folks are patting themselves on the back for charitable acts, we’ve got a perpetual poverty machine.

Peter Buffett, “The Charitable Industrial Complex" | The New York Times, July 26, 2013

This thought-provoking editorial about the ultra-rich reinforcing global inequality by supposed “charitable” endeavors is a must read.

Filed under Charity Guilt Inequality wealth accumulation 1% one percent politics economy poverty

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mattbors:

An ad in The Economist, directly appealing to the 1% and how hard they work.

Just about every ad in The Economist is this one. Legit. Andrew and I received a subscription as a wedding present and don’t get me wrong — it’s interesting and we enjoy it. However, the ads feel like fascinating, slightly uncomfortable anthropological research.

mattbors:

An ad in The Economist, directly appealing to the 1% and how hard they work.

Just about every ad in The Economist is this one. Legit. Andrew and I received a subscription as a wedding present and don’t get me wrong — it’s interesting and we enjoy it. However, the ads feel like fascinating, slightly uncomfortable anthropological research.

Filed under occupy Wall Street 99% 1% Advertising Class War

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George Lucas Does Something Likeable For a Change: Revenge on Rich Neighbors

Seriously. Movies.com has the story:

George Lucas’ rich neighbors don’t want him building a movie studio in their backyard. His response is the best thing he’s done in years.

According to the San Francisco Chronicle, for four decades Lucas has owned a large swath of land in Marin County in the North San Francisco Bay and has spent the past few years trying to transform the ranch on it into a massive, nearly 300,000 square foot, state-of-the-art movie studio complete with day care center, restaurant, gym and a 200-car garage. His neighbors, however, have rejected it every step of the way. Despite the promise of bringing $300 million worth of economic activity to the area, the already-well off neighbors are worried about years’ worth of construction activity and the additional foot traffic it will bring into their neighborhood once completed.

So what is George Lucas going to do with his property now that he’s tired of his rich neighbors putting up a not-in-my-backyard stink? He wants to transform the property into low-income housing, naturally, ending their official statement with this zinger, “If everyone feels that housing is less impactful on the land, then we are hoping that people who need it the most will benefit.”

He’s working with the Marin Community Foundation to instead construct affordable housing for either low-income families or seniors living on small, fixed incomes. In order to smooth along the development, he’s already given them all of the pricey technical studies and land surveys Lucasfilm spent years conducting. And we think that’s just great. Because if there’s one thing rich people will hate more than having movie magic made in their backyard, it’s poor people moving in.

Dude. I take back every terrible thing I have ever said about George Lucas. Well, almost. There’s the whole trilogy issue, but really… Bravo, sir.

Bravo.

Filed under George Lucas Doing the right thing 1% politics economics poverty applause Lucasfilms Star Wars

327 notes

Mitt Romney’s tax returns shed some light on his investment wealth

Here’s what we’ve all been waiting for, folks:

The couple gave away $7 million in charitable contributions over the past two years, including at least $4.1 million to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 

The Romneys sent somewhat less to Washington over that period, paying an estimated $6.2 million in federal income taxes. According to his 2010 return, Romney paid about $3 million to the IRS, for an effective tax rate of 13.9 percent.

For 2011, Romney estimates that he will pay about $3.2 million, for an effective rate of 15.4 percent. That’s in line with his earlier estimates, but sharply lower than the rates paid by President Obama and Romney’s closest Republican rival, Newt Gingrich.

Here’s some perspective for you.

The 15% tax bracket for 2011:

  • Single filers: $8,501 - $34,500
  • Married filing jointly: $17,001 - $69,000
  • Married filing separately: $8,501- $34,500
  • Head of household: $12,151 - $46,250

The Romneys paid a comparable tax rate to what a person living below the poverty line could pay. The poverty threshold for a single person is $10,890. Due to tax credits and deductions, people at that level would typically get a refund - if they fill out their taxes correctly or pay someone to do it. 

Because of tax credits and deductions, the Romneys were able to take that tax rate and make it their own. 

No wonder he kept emphasizing he paid only what he “legally” had to pay. At least Gingrich was much closer to the nearly 35% tax rate for his income bracket.

By asking to Mitt Romney and similarly situated people to pay more in taxes, we’re not punishing success. We’re asking them to pitch in their fair share. If Romney wants to push for a bigger military, well, then I’m going to push for higher taxes. He can damn well pay for it. After all, my tax burden is heavier than his, since we’re apparently paying in at the same rate.

(Source: cognitivedissonance)

Filed under Mitt Romney Politics Taxes 1% Seriously Fucking hell GOP Republican

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John King: But some of the questions about when you release your taxes have not come — the president has raised them; his campaign has raised them - you’re right on that - but so have some of your rivals up here. Speaker Gingrich has said you owe them to the people of South Carolina before they vote. Governor Perry made that point as well before he left the race. Why not should the people of South Carolina before this election see last year’s return?

Mitt Romney: Because I want to make sure that I beat President Obama … I — I obviously pay all full taxes. I’m honest in my dealings with people. People understand that. My taxes are carefully managed and I pay a lot of taxes. I’ve been very successful and when I have our — our taxes ready for this year, I’ll release them.

Mitt Romney, in one of the most telling, jaw-dropping exchanges of the night at the South Carolina Republican CNN Debate

Let me reiterate: Romney says if he releases his tax returns now, he may not beat Barack Obama. If he thinks that will quash speculation about his taxes, Romney’s sorely mistaken.

(Source: cognitivedissonance)

Filed under Mitt Romney Taxes Politics CNN Debate Republican 1%

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You know, I think it’s about envy. I think it’s about class warfare. When you have a president encouraging the idea of dividing America based on the 99 percent versus one percent — and those people who have been most successful will be in the one percent — you have opened up a whole new wave of approach in this country which is entirely inconsistent with the concept of one nation under God. The American people, I believe in the final analysis, will reject it.

I think it’s fine to talk about those things in quiet rooms and discussions about tax policy and the like. But the president has made it part of his campaign rally. Everywhere he goes we hear him talking about millionaires and billionaires and executives and Wall Street. It’s a very envy-oriented, attack-oriented approach and I think it will fail.

Mitt Romney, on Wednesday’s Today Show, discussing criticism of Wall Street and the rich. In other words, “Hey, poor people. Y’all are just jealous.”

Funny that. A Pew Poll released yesterday shows nearly two-thirds of the public (66%) believes there are “very strong” or “strong” conflicts between the rich and the poor—an increase of 19 percentage points since 2009. Also, participants identified the conflict between rich and poor as the largest, strong source of conflict in society:

If Romney is to be believed, at least two-thirds of Americans are just jealous.

Filed under Mitt Romney Politics Rich class warfare President Obama Obama Republican Republicans 99% 1% class warfare class economy Wall Street wealth inequality income

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Mitt Romney totally understands the struggles of the working class. He talked to one of their ambassadors once as he got his shoes shined next to a private jet. </sarcasm>
Remember George Romney’s advice to his son, Mitt: “Never get involved in politics if you have to win election to pay a mortgage.” 
(h/t to @Shopaholic_918)
Update: I got a message from someone who said he might be getting wanded here via private security check. Either could be possible, but I might need new glasses. Thanks Kelly!

Mitt Romney totally understands the struggles of the working class. He talked to one of their ambassadors once as he got his shoes shined next to a private jet. </sarcasm>

Remember George Romney’s advice to his son, Mitt: “Never get involved in politics if you have to win election to pay a mortgage.” 

(h/t to @Shopaholic_918)

Update: I got a message from someone who said he might be getting wanded here via private security check. Either could be possible, but I might need new glasses. Thanks Kelly!

Filed under Mitt Romney 1% politics republican republicans

377 notes

Mitt Romney has been a dick since at least age nineteen. For reals. From The Daily Mail:

A newly-unearthed photograph showing Mitt Romney demonstrating in favour of the Vietnam War draft might leave the presidential candidate feeling somewhat embarrassed.
The veteran Republican, then 19, can be seen picketing an anti-war sit-in at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, in 1966.

Romney received a draft exemption based upon his status as a &#8220;minister of religion&#8221; - basically, an exemption for having been a Mormon missionary. He received numerous deferments after that for educational reasons. Romney portrays his mission in Paris as a time of humbling poverty, but The Daily Telegraph has a different story:

The Republican presidential hopeful spent a significant portion of his 30-month mission in a Paris mansion described by fellow American missionaries to The Daily Telegraph as &#8220;palace&#8221;. It featured stained glass windows, chandeliers, and an extensive art collection and was staffed by two servants.
For most of 1968, Romney lived in the Mission Home, a 19th century neoclassical building in the French capital&#8217;s chic 16th arrondissement. &#8220;It was a house built by and for rich people,&#8221; said Richard Anderson, the son of the mission president at the time of Romney&#8217;s stay. Tearful as he described the house, Mr Anderson, 70, of Kaysville, Utah, said Romney aides had asked him not to speak publicly about their time together there.
Romney said of his French lodgings: &#8220;I don&#8217;t recall any of them having a refrigerator. We shopped before every meal&#8221;. Anderson said that as well as a refrigerator, the mansion had &#8220;a Spanish chef called Pardo and a house boy, who prepared lunch and supper five days a week&#8221;. 
Romney added in his comments that &#8220;most of the apartments I lived in had no shower or bathtub&#8221;. He said: &#8220;If we were lucky, we actually bought a hose and we stuck it on the sink.&#8221; He said he was forced to use a hole in the ground and a bucket for a lavatory and said, &#8220;I lived in a way that people of lower middle income in France lived, and said to myself, &#8216;Wow, I sure am lucky to have been born in the United States of America.&#8217;&#8221;

Sounds rough, no? Perhaps it was this time of strife that led him to make his most recent housing decision:

It recently emerged that Mr Romney has plans to quadruple the size of his $12 million California home. The 64-year-old filed an application in San Diego, California, to bulldoze his 3,009-square-foot oceanfront mansion in La Jolla and replace it with an 11,062-square-foot property.
A campaign official said that the GOP hopeful was planning the expansion as the home he bought three years ago &#8216;is inadequate for their needs&#8217;.

Mitt Romney: Representing the 1% since 1966, lying about his poverty since at least 2011.

Mitt Romney (center) and his Bain colleagues in a 1980s photo used by Americans United for Change.

Mitt Romney has been a dick since at least age nineteen. For reals. From The Daily Mail:

A newly-unearthed photograph showing Mitt Romney demonstrating in favour of the Vietnam War draft might leave the presidential candidate feeling somewhat embarrassed.

The veteran Republican, then 19, can be seen picketing an anti-war sit-in at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, in 1966.

Romney received a draft exemption based upon his status as a “minister of religion” - basically, an exemption for having been a Mormon missionary. He received numerous deferments after that for educational reasons. Romney portrays his mission in Paris as a time of humbling poverty, but The Daily Telegraph has a different story:

The Republican presidential hopeful spent a significant portion of his 30-month mission in a Paris mansion described by fellow American missionaries to The Daily Telegraph as “palace”. It featured stained glass windows, chandeliers, and an extensive art collection and was staffed by two servants.

For most of 1968, Romney lived in the Mission Home, a 19th century neoclassical building in the French capital’s chic 16th arrondissement. “It was a house built by and for rich people,” said Richard Anderson, the son of the mission president at the time of Romney’s stay. Tearful as he described the house, Mr Anderson, 70, of Kaysville, Utah, said Romney aides had asked him not to speak publicly about their time together there.

Romney said of his French lodgings: “I don’t recall any of them having a refrigerator. We shopped before every meal”. Anderson said that as well as a refrigerator, the mansion had “a Spanish chef called Pardo and a house boy, who prepared lunch and supper five days a week”. 

Romney added in his comments that “most of the apartments I lived in had no shower or bathtub”. He said: “If we were lucky, we actually bought a hose and we stuck it on the sink.” He said he was forced to use a hole in the ground and a bucket for a lavatory and said, “I lived in a way that people of lower middle income in France lived, and said to myself, ‘Wow, I sure am lucky to have been born in the United States of America.’”

Sounds rough, no? Perhaps it was this time of strife that led him to make his most recent housing decision:

It recently emerged that Mr Romney has plans to quadruple the size of his $12 million California home. The 64-year-old filed an application in San Diego, California, to bulldoze his 3,009-square-foot oceanfront mansion in La Jolla and replace it with an 11,062-square-foot property.

A campaign official said that the GOP hopeful was planning the expansion as the home he bought three years ago ‘is inadequate for their needs’.

Mitt Romney: Representing the 1% since 1966, lying about his poverty since at least 2011.

Mitt Romney (center) and his Bain colleagues in a 1980s photo used by Americans United for Change.

Filed under Mitt Romney 1% politics protest Vietnam Bain Rich dishonest seriously GOP Republican Republicans conservative Conservatives Election 2012 2012

106 notes

On the 1% advocating for the 99%

The red and blue is not be taken as representative of political party. However, it IS an interesting breakdown of where the interests of the US Congress fall. Alan Grayson has also pointed to lobbying influence as well. At a 2010 conference, Grayson said, “We’re now in a situation where a lobbyist can walk into my office…and say, ‘I’ve got five million dollars to spend, and I can spend it for you or against you. Which do you prefer?’”

Much has also been made of Occupy Wall Street promoters like Michael Moore being in the 1%, so why don’t they just give away all of their money and make everyone equal, etc… I’m tired of this strawman counter. That’s like telling a group of physicians concerned about the situation in Appalachia regarding medical care to stop advocating for change, and to instead donate all their time, money, and supplies to fixing it, or else they are an illegitimate organization and have no right to bitch.

Moore has given generously to charity, including 60% of the profits from Fahrenheit 9/11, he donates half of his royalties from books sold at local bookstores to local libraries (plus the bookstores running the events have all agreed to donate $1 from their sales price) at each stop on his recent book tour, he works with several progressive organizations and with unions, and began the non-profit, mostly volunteer-run Traverse City Film Festival in Michigan - among other efforts. Here, he further explains his thoughts on charity to Sean Hannity.

So let’s pretend for a moment that the rich redistribute to the jobless of their own free will. Then what? Do jobs magically appear out of thin air? The need never re-occurs?

Moore explains his viewpoint well on being a member of the 1% and fighting for the 99% in a post entitled "Life Among The 1%" [emphasis mine]:

"How can you claim to be for the poor when you are the opposite of poor?!" It’s like asking: "You’ve never had sex with another man - how can you be for gay marriage?!" I guess the same way that an all-male Congress voted to give women the vote, or scores of white people marched with Martin Luther Ling, Jr. (I can hear these righties yelling back through history: "Hey! You’re not black! You’re not being lynched! Why are you with the blacks?!"). It is precisely this disconnect that prevents Republicans from understanding why anyone would give of their time or money to help out those less fortunate. It is simply something their brain cannot process. "Kanye West makes millions! What’s he doing at Occupy Wall Street?!" Exactly - he’s down there demanding that his taxes be raised. That, to a right-winger, is the definition of insanity. To everyone else, we are grateful that people like him stand up, even if and especially because it is against his own personal financial interest. It is specifically what that Bible those conservatives wave around demands of those who are well off.

Anyhow, money is not electing Michael Moore. However, money is electing those who set the policies leading to such wealth disparity in this country. We must pay attention to those who’ve sold us out and continued the same policies since before many in my generation were even born. Campaign finance reform is crucial, and perhaps we should begin rethinking this whole neoliberal, late capitalism thing.

If your biggest bone to pick with Occupy Wall Street is that Michael Moore is advocating for it, we’re well on our way to winning.

(Source: cognitivedissonance)

Filed under Michael Moore inequality politics protest 99% 1% poverty capitalism economy financial reform crisis late capitalism wealth injustice charity

2,389 notes

This is a big deal. Dan Siegel, legal adviser to Oakland, Calif. Mayor Jean Quan, resigned over the brutalization of Occupy Oakland protesters and says he now supports the Occupy Wall Street movement. Approximately an hour ago, he wrote on Twitter, “No longer Mayor Quan’s legal advisor. Resigned at 2 am. Support Occupy Oakland, not the 1% and its government facilitators.”

This came after he encouraged people to mobilize to Occupy Oakland late last night, where another raid resulted in upwards of 32 arrests, according to Occupy Oakland leaders. Police declared the park a crime scene Monday and forced media to leave.

If more high-ranking municipal officials have an attack of conscience and do the right thing, what then? It appears city and state governments are already a titch frightened of the Occupy movement. If their own people refuse to obey or resign in protest, perhaps it will be time to take this a little more seriously. Change from the bottom on up, folks.

(Source: cognitivedissonance)

Filed under Dan Siegel BFD Jean Quan Mayor Jean Quan Occupy Oakland Oakland California politics protest injustice inequality Doing the right thing 1% 99% Occupy Wall Street OWS Occupy Everywhere

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Also controversial was the collision between three Occupy protesters and a car outside the convention center. [Clare] O’Connor reports that the protesters set up makeshift blockades on streets surrounding the center. One driver, identified as Shawn Valentine, plowed through the blockade, injuring protester Heidi Sippel, her thirteen-year-old son, and her wife Brandy Sippel, who is three months pregnant. According to Occupy, he also hit a fourth victim who is still hospitalized.

Police did not charge the driver — Lt Christopher Micciche says the Sippels “either ran toward or jumped in front of the moving vehicle.” He adds that “it was essentially an accident where three individuals were injured but they were in violation by being in the roadway.” The Sippels, meanwhile, say they were charged with a traffic violation and fined.

Anna North, "Police Bravely Defend Man’s Right To Hit Pregnant Protester With Car"

Jesus. This guy hits a kid and a pregnant woman, plus two other people and is NOT cited?! Adding insult to injury, the people he hit were cited. According to The Telegraph, they were cited for “for obstructing traffic and being in the road in contravention of a ‘do-not-walk’ sign, both of which carry fines.”

Fuck everything about this - can you folks imagine the outrage if a doctor working at a Planned Parenthood got angry at the protesters blocking the exit to the parking lot and then plowed into a few? Operation Rescue used this very tactic of blocking streets and parking lots. From the Supreme Court of Florida:

As traffic slowed on Dixie Way and began its turn into the clinic’s driveway, the vehicle would be approached by persons designated by the respondents as sidewalk counselors attempting to get the attention of the vehicles’ occupants to give them anti-abortion literature and to urge them not to use the clinic’s services. Such so-called sidewalk counselors were assisted in accomplishing their approach to the vehicle by the hesitation or momentary stopping caused by the time needed for the picket line to open up before the vehicle could enter the parking lot.

The outcry would be tremendous. Fox would be on the scene within minutes. Now, Operation Rescue was prevented from doing this later by federal injunction. Later, police would direct traffic if need be at Operation Rescue rallies in order to prevent protesters getting hit by cars or traffic snarls. 

Why didn’t that happen in DC? Where were police? I live in Laramie, Wyoming. When we have huge sporting events connected to the University of Wyoming, our city’s population can effectively double for the day. Before and after football (or basketball) games, there’s masses of people running across the road, walking on the road, sometimes slapping the hoods of cars that come close, and generally making the busiest road in town absolute hell. Guess what? Police direct traffic. When there’s people in the road, you address the traffic situation in order to avoid people getting hit.

Or you can send the message that as long as you are driving a luxury car, like Mr. Shawn Valentine, you can hit all the people you want. As long as they’re Occupy protesters. Or poor.

Filed under Occupy DC Occupy Wall Street OWS Politics Shawn Valentine protest Heidi Sippel Brandy Sippel Occupy Everywhere 1% 99% police injustice inequality

50 notes

Traders From Chicago Board Of Trade Dump McDonald’s Applications On Occupy Chicago Protesters

Ah, yes. The Chicago Board of Trade keeps it classy. Remember this? They posted the “We are the 1%” sign in their windows to mock Occupy Chicago. The sad truth is that they’re probably not in the 1%.

The truly asshole move is not the dumping of applications themselves. It’s that McDonald’s most recent hiring day resulted in 938,000 applicants being turned away from even part-time employment at McDonald’s. Plus, the traders appear to have violated state law in regards to the Illinois Litter Control Act.

It’s cool, though. Because these hippies just need to get a job, amirite?! There’s one job opening for every 4-5 people looking, but you just need to TRY HARDER! LULZ! </sarcasm>

Filed under Chicago Board of Trade Occupy Chicago Politics inequality protest economy McDonald's For fuck's sake Asshattery 1% 99% Occupy Wall Street OWS Occupy Everywhere

44 notes

The epitome of heartlessness:

What the Costumes RevealBy JOE NOCERA Published: October 28, 2011
On Friday, the law firm of Steven J. Baum threw a Halloween party. The firm, which is located near Buffalo, is what is commonly referred to as a &#8220;foreclosure mill&#8221; firm, meaning it represents banks and mortgage servicers as they attempt to foreclose on homeowners and evict them from their homes.
Steven J. Baum is, in fact, the largest such firm in New York; it represents virtually all the giant mortgage lenders, including Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Wells Fargo.  The party is the firm&#8217;s big annual bash. Employees wear Halloween costumes to the office, where they party until around noon, and then return to work, still in costume.
I can&#8217;t tell you how people dressed for this year&#8217;s party, but I can tell you about last year&#8217;s.  That&#8217;s because a former employee of Steven J. Baum recently sent me snapshots of last year&#8217;s party.

This is one photo from the party. Here&#8217;s the columnist&#8217;s description:

Let me describe a few of the photos. In one, two Baum employees are dressed like homeless people. One is holding a bottle of liquor. The other has a sign around her neck that reads: &#8220;3rd party squatter. I lost my home and I was never served.&#8221; My source said that &#8220;I was never served&#8221; is meant to mock &#8220;the typical excuse&#8221; of the homeowner trying to evade a foreclosure proceeding.

Here are agents of the 1% mocking what the 99% are going through. Is this not class warfare? Why is it only class warfare when we call this out? When we suggest that maybe people losing their homes right and left is unconscionable, it&#8217;s somehow class warfare waged by the 99%. This kind of mockery goes on, Wall St. continues unregulated, and WE&#8217;RE the ones waging war. I beg to differ.

The epitome of heartlessness:

What the Costumes Reveal
By JOE NOCERA Published: October 28, 2011

On Friday, the law firm of Steven J. Baum threw a Halloween party. The firm, which is located near Buffalo, is what is commonly referred to as a “foreclosure mill” firm, meaning it represents banks and mortgage servicers as they attempt to foreclose on homeowners and evict them from their homes.

Steven J. Baum is, in fact, the largest such firm in New York; it represents virtually all the giant mortgage lenders, including Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Wells Fargo. The party is the firm’s big annual bash. Employees wear Halloween costumes to the office, where they party until around noon, and then return to work, still in costume.

I can’t tell you how people dressed for this year’s party, but I can tell you about last year’s. That’s because a former employee of Steven J. Baum recently sent me snapshots of last year’s party.

This is one photo from the party. Here’s the columnist’s description:

Let me describe a few of the photos. In one, two Baum employees are dressed like homeless people. One is holding a bottle of liquor. The other has a sign around her neck that reads: “3rd party squatter. I lost my home and I was never served.” My source said that “I was never served” is meant to mock “the typical excuse” of the homeowner trying to evade a foreclosure proceeding.

Here are agents of the 1% mocking what the 99% are going through. Is this not class warfare? Why is it only class warfare when we call this out? When we suggest that maybe people losing their homes right and left is unconscionable, it’s somehow class warfare waged by the 99%. This kind of mockery goes on, Wall St. continues unregulated, and WE’RE the ones waging war. I beg to differ.

(Source: The New York Times)

Filed under Occupy Wall Street New York Halloween politics foreclosure Steven J Baum Citigroup JPMorgan Chase Bank of America Wells Fargo fuckery 1% 99%