Cognitive Dissonance

"Democracy! Bah! When I hear that I reach for my feather boa!" - Allen Ginsberg

Posts tagged Business

349 notes

Hey folks! Do you live in or near Cheyenne, Wyo.? The Outlaw Saloon doesn’t want same-sex couples or GLBTQ people participating in their Wednesday night promotions. What’s that, you ask? Well, according to folks who’ve called over there it’s a singles night/speed dating type thing, where single people can wear name tags and meet up with someone. Afterwards, one of the members of the pair gets to drink for free.
My pal Will wrote, “Get this — they don’t allow same-sex couples because then two straight girls could take advantage of the system and a pair could be drinking for half price but not trying to date!”
Yep. Straight girls always pretend to be lesbians to drink for half-price. Duh. It’s not like actual lesbians could be hitting up the bar. </sarcasm>
Or perhaps it’s just plain wrong to put up a sign outside your establishment prohibiting an entire class of people from patronizing it on a certain day. Cue the free market denizens howling about the right to prohibit people from your place of business, but this:

They’ve disabled their Facebook page, but here’s their page on Yelp if you’d like to let them know what you think about this blanket prohibition. After all, the free market picks winners and losers right?
I’d say The Outlaw Saloon is a loser, my friends.

Hey folks! Do you live in or near Cheyenne, Wyo.? The Outlaw Saloon doesn’t want same-sex couples or GLBTQ people participating in their Wednesday night promotions. What’s that, you ask? Well, according to folks who’ve called over there it’s a singles night/speed dating type thing, where single people can wear name tags and meet up with someone. Afterwards, one of the members of the pair gets to drink for free.

My pal Will wrote, “Get this — they don’t allow same-sex couples because then two straight girls could take advantage of the system and a pair could be drinking for half price but not trying to date!”

Yep. Straight girls always pretend to be lesbians to drink for half-price. Duh. It’s not like actual lesbians could be hitting up the bar. </sarcasm>

Or perhaps it’s just plain wrong to put up a sign outside your establishment prohibiting an entire class of people from patronizing it on a certain day. Cue the free market denizens howling about the right to prohibit people from your place of business, but this:

They’ve disabled their Facebook page, but here’s their page on Yelp if you’d like to let them know what you think about this blanket prohibition. After all, the free market picks winners and losers right?

I’d say The Outlaw Saloon is a loser, my friends.

Filed under The Outlaw discrimination Wyoming Cheyenne GLBTQ gay rights just wrong gay business

66 notes

Well, that calling for the boycott is a real — has a chilling effect on our 1st Amendment rights. And the owner of the Chick-fil-A business had merely voiced his personal opinion about supporting traditional definition of marriage, one boy, one girl, falling in love, getting married. And having voiced support for kind of that cornerstone of all civilization and all religions since the beginning of time, he then basically [is] getting crucified.

I’m speaking up for him and his 1st Amendment rights and anybody else who would wish to express their not anti-gay people sentiment, but their support of traditional marriage, which President Obama and Joe Biden, they both supported the exact same thing until just a few months ago, when Obama had to flip-flop to shore up the homosexual voter base.

Sarah Palin, continuing her desperate last gasps of trying be relevant on Fox News.

Typically, I wouldn’t give her more attention. But I’ve heard this argument so many damn times over the few days, so let’s roll.

First, what Dan Cathy said IS anti-gay and he’s donated to anti-gay organizations — groups which have helped the efforts in Uganda to criminalize homosexuality and execute gay people, are listed as hate groups by the Southern Poverty Law Center, and who have called for harmful “reparative therapy” to be standard treatment for gay people.

Plenty of folks have pointed out that this is not the way to spread a message of love thy neighbor. I would agree. As Suzette Standring wrote, “Jesus healed, socialized, walked, and ate with the marginalized and the flawed. Peter had anger management issues. Matthew was a hated tax collector. The Samaritan woman at the well was considered off limits to talk to for racial reasons. When an adulteress was about to be stoned, it was Jesus who challenged the sinless to cast the first stone. Her attackers left and when it was clear no one stayed to condemn her, Jesus said with great gentleness, ‘Then neither do I condemn you. Go now and leave your life of sin’ (John 8:1-11)… If Jesus had harsh words for anyone, it was against those who saw themselves as the authorities of spiritual leadership. He criticized them publicly for hypocrisy, setting bad examples, and for perverting the word of God in order to maintain their own power.”

Second, I know this is difficult, but read this, plus this, this, this, and this. That’s why you’re 100% wrong about boycotts. Boycotts are free speech. Think about money as speech. Withholding money is also speech. It goes both ways. Please see Less Than One Million Moms and their boycotts against JC Penney, Ellen DeGeneres, and the NBC show The New Normal

Third, as Meghan McCain said, being anti-marriage equality IS being anti-gay. Is being anti-interracial marriage racist? You betcha.

Fourth, if a business owner gets political, even for religious reasons, expect a backlash. You don’t get to reel back and say, “Hey, no hard feelings, homos. Buy my chicken.” If your chicken gets political, we get political with your chicken. You dig?

In summary, go back to Alaska, snowbilly.

Filed under Sarah Palin First Amendment Chick-fil-A Boycott free speech business politics religion fail GOP Republican Conservative anti-gay bigotry marriage equality GLBTQ GLBTQ Rights gay rights Christian

20 notes

On the First Amendment, the free market, and boycotts, part III

mrpooscratch replied to your post: On the First Amendment, the free market, and boycotts, part II

Okay, lets look at it this way. I open a business, and put out a sign saying “no redheads allowed”. Doesn’t it stand to reason minus government interference, minus the boycotts, minus the protests, the free market will make my business fail?

Maybe. Or your business might fail because your product sucks. Or maybe angry redheads will organize a boycott. Or maybe it’ll get hit by falling space debris that somehow didn’t burn up in the atmosphere. The free market is unpredictable, and to simply rely on the hope that it will make a business fail because reasons is honestly lazy. If you disagree with a business’ practices to the extent you’re willing to no longer patronize them, why not take the action of telling others? The business does not exist in an apathetic bubble. 

And for those bitching about government interference, it’s called zoning. It’s why the government can regulate whether or not a Dildo Emporium can open next to a preschool or if it must exist outside the city limits. If a business wants to open and that business engages in practices that my town has a law against, say non-discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender, that could conceivably fall under a government’s right to deny business permits. Think about a bar wanting to open in a dry county.

Cheers,

Meg 

Filed under reply mrpooscratch free market free speech business politics

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Meet Eve, the eight-year-old agony aunt

Eve Hobsbawm is a London-based life counsellor. Make contact through her website – EveProblemSolver.com – and for a small fee she will send you helpful advice.

Two weeks ago, I got in touch: I had lost my keys, and was panicking about what to cook my friends. But I also couldn’t work out how Eve manages to run a business while attending school – since she is just eight years old.

It all started in December, when Eve was seven. “The first person I exchanged business cards with said her husband was really annoying. So I said: ‘It all cancels out. You might do stuff to him that’s also really annoying.’ She was really impressed.”

Eve has consulted on roughly 40 dilemmas, with payments ranging from 10p to £5. She hopes in time to build the problem-solving equivalent of a walk-in doctor’s surgery.

Is she any good? I’d say so. Eve suggested my keys were in the hall – and they were – and recommended spaghetti as a quick and easy meal, which it was. All for £2.

This little girl is fantastic. 

Filed under Eve Hobsbawm Problem solving business adorable news life counselor self-employed

21 notes

I like being able to fire people.

Mitt Romney, giving a campaign speech and gift-wrapping a future attack ad for the Democratic Party.

Video:

Wow. Just wow. To be fair, the full explanation was: “I like being able to fire people who provide services to me.” However, in light of his downsizing experience at Bain Capital, what’s going to be reinforced is those first seven words.

When explaining his experience at Bain, Romney said, “I’ve learned what it’s like to sign the front of a paycheck and not just the back of a paycheck and to know how frightening it is to see whether you can make payroll at the end of the week. There were a couple of times I wondered whether I was going to get a pink slip.”

At Bain, he didn’t mind distributing those pink slips to make investors wealthy. Though Romney touts Bain as job creation, a former partner at Bain said their mission was clear. From the Los Angeles Times: “I never thought of what I do for a living as job creation,” said Marc Walpow, a former managing partner at Bain who worked closely with Romney for nine years before forming his own firm. “The primary goal of private equity is to create wealth for your investors.”

Bain Capital, according to the Times, “maximized returns by firing workers, seeking government subsidies, and flipping companies quickly for large profits. Sometimes Bain investors gained even when companies slid into bankruptcy.” Despite Romney’s wish to project it as running a small business, it’s not the same as running a mom-and-pop store. Bain Capital’s mission was more like the Bobs from Office Space

(Source: cognitivedissonance)

Filed under Mitt Romney politics Republican Republicans Bain Capital business downsizing economy seriously

29 notes

What is Disgusting

opprobrium1:

Can you believe that closing corporate tax loopholes is an actual bargaining chip in negotiations? Is there a more bald way to state that we live in a corporate kleptocracy? To be clear, Republicans put deals that fight corruption up on the negotiating table. They don’t fight corruption as a matter of choice, only when they benefit from it. Think about that, and think about how much power this country wields. Then try not to throw up.

We are owned by business.

Keep speaking truth to power… 

Filed under Republican republicans Business kleptocracy politics

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liberalsarecool:

A Reuters investigation has discovered that over 2,000 business are registered at a single-family home in Wyoming.

The house at 2710 Thomes Avenue serves as a little Cayman Island on the Great Plains. It is the headquarters for Wyoming Corporate Services, a business-incorporation specialist that establishes firms which can be used as “shell” companies, paper entities able to hide assets.

Wyoming Corporate Services will help clients create a company, and more: set up a bank account for it; add a lawyer as a corporate director to invoke attorney-client privilege; even appoint stand-in directors and officers as high as CEO. Among its offerings is a variety of shell known as a “shelf” company, which comes with years of regulatory filings behind it, lending a greater feeling of solidity.

Read the full article here.

My husband, Andrew Simons, ran for Secretary of State in Wyoming in 2010 as a Democrat. His opponent championed what he had done to drive shell companies from the state. In Wyoming, they must have a physical presence and this apparently counts…

This is one practice Andrew wanted to change - companies should actually be here, versus just a mailbox and a representative.

So Wyoming, embarrassed yet? You should be. 

(Source: liberalsarecool)

Filed under Wyoming Andrew Simons Secretary of State politics Business fraud Max Maxfield corporations

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Tales from the Debt Collection Crypt

When the widespread use of "robo-signers"—low-level employees signing mountains of foreclosure legal filings without actually reading what they said—bubbled to the surface this fall, it sparked public outrage and a 50-state investigation of mortgage companies by state attorneys general. But now the seamy debt-collection industry has one-upped the foreclosure industry’s robo-signing disaster. One of America’s largest debt collectors, Portfolio Recovery Associates, used court filings that were signed by a woman who’d died nearly a decade earlier.

I’ll admit, I owe medical debt and these people are relentless. They will hound to your grave, and apparently, beyond their own grave.

Filed under Debt collection business money debt profiting off misery