Cognitive Dissonance

"Democracy! Bah! When I hear that I reach for my feather boa!" - Allen Ginsberg

Posts tagged New York

24 notes

Seriously?
Really?
First off, one of these things is not like the others — Rob Ford is a conservative through and through. Also, Barack Obama and Tim Bishop have not admitted to smoking crack in a self-described “drunken stupor.”
And this guy KNOWS Toronto isn’t a part of the US, right? Not unless this is a launch of his “Annex ‘Merica’s Hat” plan…
Full story: http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/gop-challenger-tries-to-link-ny-dem-to-rob-ford

Seriously?
Really?

First off, one of these things is not like the others — Rob Ford is a conservative through and through. Also, Barack Obama and Tim Bishop have not admitted to smoking crack in a self-described “drunken stupor.”

And this guy KNOWS Toronto isn’t a part of the US, right? Not unless this is a launch of his “Annex ‘Merica’s Hat” plan…

Full story: http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/gop-challenger-tries-to-link-ny-dem-to-rob-ford

Filed under rob ford politics republican new york george demos tim bishop canada america's hat u.s. house of representatives

142 notes

From US Uncut:

Happening NOW! Walmart workers are getting arrested for striking outside the company’s NYC headquarters as part of a nationwide action.

I stand in solidarity with my brothers and sisters in NYC — and everywhere else — placing their livelihood and lives at risk by standing up for the rights of workers. An injustice to one is an injustice to all.

From US Uncut:

Happening NOW! Walmart workers are getting arrested for striking outside the company’s NYC headquarters as part of a nationwide action.

I stand in solidarity with my brothers and sisters in NYC — and everywhere else — placing their livelihood and lives at risk by standing up for the rights of workers. An injustice to one is an injustice to all.

Filed under Walmart organized labor union there is power in a union Walmart strikers strike injustice inequality economic violence economic inequality NYC New York

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The epitome of heartlessness:

What the Costumes RevealBy JOE NOCERA Published: October 28, 2011
On Friday, the law firm of Steven J. Baum threw a Halloween party. The firm, which is located near Buffalo, is what is commonly referred to as a “foreclosure mill” firm, meaning it represents banks and mortgage servicers as they attempt to foreclose on homeowners and evict them from their homes.
Steven J. Baum is, in fact, the largest such firm in New York; it represents virtually all the giant mortgage lenders, including Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Wells Fargo.  The party is the firm’s big annual bash. Employees wear Halloween costumes to the office, where they party until around noon, and then return to work, still in costume.
I can’t tell you how people dressed for this year’s party, but I can tell you about last year’s.  That’s because a former employee of Steven J. Baum recently sent me snapshots of last year’s party.

This is one photo from the party. Here’s the columnist’s description:

Let me describe a few of the photos. In one, two Baum employees are dressed like homeless people. One is holding a bottle of liquor. The other has a sign around her neck that reads: “3rd party squatter. I lost my home and I was never served.” My source said that “I was never served” is meant to mock “the typical excuse” of the homeowner trying to evade a foreclosure proceeding.

Here are agents of the 1% mocking what the 99% are going through. Is this not class warfare? Why is it only class warfare when we call this out? When we suggest that maybe people losing their homes right and left is unconscionable, it’s somehow class warfare waged by the 99%. This kind of mockery goes on, Wall St. continues unregulated, and WE’RE the ones waging war. I beg to differ.

The epitome of heartlessness:

What the Costumes Reveal
By JOE NOCERA Published: October 28, 2011

On Friday, the law firm of Steven J. Baum threw a Halloween party. The firm, which is located near Buffalo, is what is commonly referred to as a “foreclosure mill” firm, meaning it represents banks and mortgage servicers as they attempt to foreclose on homeowners and evict them from their homes.

Steven J. Baum is, in fact, the largest such firm in New York; it represents virtually all the giant mortgage lenders, including Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Wells Fargo. The party is the firm’s big annual bash. Employees wear Halloween costumes to the office, where they party until around noon, and then return to work, still in costume.

I can’t tell you how people dressed for this year’s party, but I can tell you about last year’s. That’s because a former employee of Steven J. Baum recently sent me snapshots of last year’s party.

This is one photo from the party. Here’s the columnist’s description:

Let me describe a few of the photos. In one, two Baum employees are dressed like homeless people. One is holding a bottle of liquor. The other has a sign around her neck that reads: “3rd party squatter. I lost my home and I was never served.” My source said that “I was never served” is meant to mock “the typical excuse” of the homeowner trying to evade a foreclosure proceeding.

Here are agents of the 1% mocking what the 99% are going through. Is this not class warfare? Why is it only class warfare when we call this out? When we suggest that maybe people losing their homes right and left is unconscionable, it’s somehow class warfare waged by the 99%. This kind of mockery goes on, Wall St. continues unregulated, and WE’RE the ones waging war. I beg to differ.

(Source: The New York Times)

Filed under Occupy Wall Street New York Halloween politics foreclosure Steven J Baum Citigroup JPMorgan Chase Bank of America Wells Fargo fuckery 1% 99%

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New York cops defy order to arrest hundreds of ‘Occupy Albany’ protesters

Occupy Albany protesters in New York’s capital city received an unexpected ally over the week: The state and local authorities.

According to the Albany Times Union, New York state troopers and Albany police did not adhere to a curfew crackdown on protesters urged by Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) and Albany Mayor Gerald Jennings.

Mass arrests seemed to be in the cards once Jennings directed officers to enforce the curfew on roughly 700 protesters occupying the city owned park. But as state police joined the local cops, protesters moved past the property line dividing city and state land.

With protesters acting peacefully, local and state police agreed that low level arrests could cause a riot, so they decided instead to defy Cuomo and Jennings.

"We don’t have those resources, and these people were not causing trouble," a state official said. "The bottom line is the police know policing, not the governor and not the mayor."

This is such uplifting and welcome news after last night’s horrific events in Oakland. The Albany police have demonstrated why we must keep it peaceful. The police are the 99% - join us. 

Filed under Occupy Albany Occupy Wall Street Occupy Everywhere politics police Andrew Cuomo Gerald Jennings New York you're doing it right

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Goldman Sachs Sends Its Regrets to This Awkward Dinner Invitation

Earlier this month, hundreds of New Yorkers received an unusual dinner invitation from the Lower East Side People’s Federal Credit Union.

The Credit Union, a small lender serving New York’s poor, was holding a fund-raiser to celebrate its 25th anniversary. Among the chief sponsors listed on the invitation was Goldman Sachs Group Inc.

Among the honorees: “Occupy Wall Street.”

They might as well have asked Marie Antoinette to dig into her purse to support Madame Defarge’s knitting business.

Shortly after the invitation was sent out, Goldman withdrew its name from the dinner. It also pulled the plug on its $5,000 funding pledge.

"Their money was welcome, but not at the price of giving up what we believe in," said Pablo DeFilippi, one of the dinner hosts and associate director of member development at the National Federal of Community Development Credit Unions. "We lost their $5,000, but we have our principles."

Linda Levy, CEO of the Lower East Side People’s Federal Credit Union, declined comment saying “I made promises to people about talking about this.” 

Looks like if Goldman Sachs can’t control the game, they’ll take their ball and go home. They could have spun this into a marvelous PR opportunity. Goldman Sachs could have, but they didn’t. 

Good job, guys. You’ve done the 1% proud.

Filed under Goldman Sachs politics Occupy Wall Street economy New York City Lower East Side People's Federal Credit Union New York NYC missed opportunity OWS Occupy Together

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Dr. Cornell West was arrested today protesting the NYPD’s use of “stop and frisk” searches:

Princeton professor and noted activist Cornel West was arrested last weekend for protesting in front of the Supreme Court, and on Friday afternoon he repeated the experience in New York City.
West was part of a demonstration against the New York Police Department’s “stop and frisk” policy, in which individuals considered suspicious by the police are searched without due cause.
According to Salon’s Justin Elliott, the NYPD carried out 600,000 such searches last year, with 87% of the targets being black or Hispanic. Only 7% of the searches resulted in arrest, and critics of the policy say it does little to reduce crime and is probably unconstitutional.

Here’s the speech he gave moments before the arrests began:

These searches, even if they yielded arrests the majority of the time, have enormous potential for abuse - evident with the NYPD’s application of stop and frisk searches. To me, the searches are a morally reprehensible violation of a person’s civil rights.

"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." - Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Letter from Birmingham Jail, April 16, 1963

Keep fighting, folks. King wrote in the same letter, “Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed.”

Dr. Cornell West was arrested today protesting the NYPD’s use of “stop and frisk” searches:

Princeton professor and noted activist Cornel West was arrested last weekend for protesting in front of the Supreme Court, and on Friday afternoon he repeated the experience in New York City.

West was part of a demonstration against the New York Police Department’s “stop and frisk” policy, in which individuals considered suspicious by the police are searched without due cause.

According to Salon’s Justin Elliott, the NYPD carried out 600,000 such searches last year, with 87% of the targets being black or Hispanic. Only 7% of the searches resulted in arrest, and critics of the policy say it does little to reduce crime and is probably unconstitutional.

Here’s the speech he gave moments before the arrests began:

These searches, even if they yielded arrests the majority of the time, have enormous potential for abuse - evident with the NYPD’s application of stop and frisk searches. To me, the searches are a morally reprehensible violation of a person’s civil rights.

"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." - Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Letter from Birmingham Jail, April 16, 1963

Keep fighting, folks. King wrote in the same letter, “Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed.”

Filed under Dr. Cornell West Cornell West Stop and frisk police politics NYPD unlawful search fourth amendment New York Harlem Occupy Wall Street OWS

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About that police brutality indeed… Here’s a member of the NYPD caught on camera boasting about how he’s going to beat protesters. He actually says, “My little nightstick’s going to get a workout tonight!” The officer then strikes the ground with his baton.

For more on tonight’s police brutality committed by the NYPD, click here.

Filed under NYPD Police brutality occupy wall street horrifying injustice The Whole World is Watching No justice no peace New York New York City NYC protest protesters civil rights politics

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New York City Police Department Officer Arrested on Federal Civil Rights Charges

As alleged in the complaint, on July 5, 2008, [Admir] Kacamakovic, while on duty and in uniform, assaulted with pepper spray, handcuffed and unlawfully detained a man who was involved in a parking dispute in front of a bar owned by Kacamakovic’s cousin. Using an expletive, Kacamakovic told the man that “no one f***s with my cousin’s place.” Kacamakovic also pepper-sprayed a second person during the incident. Thereafter, on two separate occasions, Kacamakovic, in violation of NYPD directives, accessed the NYPD’s computer system to obtain information from a federal database about the assault victim, who had filed both a complaint against Kacamakovic with the Civilian Complaint Review Board and a civil action in New York state court.

Boy, the NYPD likes their pepper spray, eh? Wonder if this guy is BFFs with Tony Bologna?

h/t to @AnonyOps for this release.

Filed under NYPD Admir Kacamakovic New York City NYC Police brutality civil rights FBI civil action pepper spray New York

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Occupy Wall Street: 'Pepper-spray' officer named in Bush protest claim

A senior New York police officer accused of pepper-spraying young women on the “Occupy Wall Street" demonstrations is the subject of a pending legal action over his conduct at another protest in the city.

The Guardian has learned that the officer, named by activists as deputy inspector Anthony Bologna, stands accused of false arrest and civil rights violations in a claim brought by a protester involved in the 2004 demonstrations at the Republican national convention.

Then, 1,800 people were arrested during protests against the Iraq war and the policies of president George W Bush.

Alan Levine, a civil rights lawyer representing Post A Posr, a protester at the 2004 event, told the Guardian that he filed an action against Bologna and another officer, Tulio Camejo, in 2007. The case, filed at the New York Southern District Court, is expected to be heard next year.

Shock, gasp, clutch the pearls. An officer accused of violating the civil rights of protesters is accused more than once. Interesting that it’s directed at protesters supporting progressive causes. Maybe Officer Bologna takes after the stock that created Sheriff Joe Arpaio. 

A word of advice to the NYPD: Remember Rodney King. Remember what happened after the LAPD beat him to an inch of his life and the officers responsible were not punished. Remember and learn.

Filed under Civil Rights protest Wall Street Occupy Wall Street Anthony Bologna inequality injustice police brutality New York NYPD NYC Economic violence politics police law enforcement

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NYPD Uses Law From 1845 To Arrest Masked Protestors In Financial District
As the protests against corporate greed and the "occupation" of the Financial District continues for a third day, at least seven demonstrators have been arrested. According to Bloomberg News, two were arrested for trying to enter a Bank of America building, another for jumping a police barrier, and four more for “wearing masks in violation of a law that bars two or more participants from doing so.” This law dates back to 1845 in the Anti-Rent era—a time when a wealthy few owned feudal-esque leases to maintain control of tenants. Absolutely nothinglike today!
According to a Time’s Up! volunteer, one of the four arrested on mask charges was actually nabbed for “writing with chalk on the sidewalk,” and we’re told a police captain actually “leaped forward” over the barricade to arrest that demonstrator, who explains that he was arrested because he “placed his hand” on a barricade and didn’t have time to move away after a verbal warning. CityRoom confirms that their photographer did not witness the man attempting to jump the barricade. The NYPD maintains he did.
The anti-mask statute was passed as a response to the actions of rabble-rousing renters, seeking to prevent “distress sales” of their property by their landlords, dressing up as “Indians” to protect their rights and property. N.Y. Penal Law § 240.35(4) cropped back up in the news 11 years ago, when the KKK petitioned to wear masks protesting in the city. They were prohibited from doing so because of the statute, and sued. The USDC for the Southern District of New York sided with the KKK, and ruled the law unconstitutional, but not before protesters were arrested in 2002 for the same offense.
However, the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals, which included current Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, reversed that ruling in 2004, noting that because the KKK was already wearing a hood and robe, “the expressive force of the mask is, therefore, redundant.” The judges also noted that the “individual’s right to speech must always be balanced against the state’s interest in safety, and its right to regulate conduct that it legitimately considers potentially dangerous.”
Around 70 signs were reportedly stolen overnight by the NYPD as they maintained 24-hour surveillance of the area, which is being occupied by demonstrators in tents and sleeping bags.

I hope those arrested challenge their arrests on First Amendment grounds. This law seems to be constitutionally specious at best. If you’re arrested, attempt to document and/or remember everything. Then, call 212-679-6018 for the National Lawyer’s Guild, or 212-607-3300 for the ACLU. Write these numbers on your arm in sharpie.
I stand in solidarity with those occupying Wall Street. Stay strong. Estoy en solidaridad con las personas que ocupan Wall Street. Por favor mantenga fuerte en la actualidad.

NYPD Uses Law From 1845 To Arrest Masked Protestors In Financial District

As the protests against corporate greed and the "occupation" of the Financial District continues for a third day, at least seven demonstrators have been arrested. According to Bloomberg News, two were arrested for trying to enter a Bank of America building, another for jumping a police barrier, and four more for “wearing masks in violation of a law that bars two or more participants from doing so.” This law dates back to 1845 in the Anti-Rent era—a time when a wealthy few owned feudal-esque leases to maintain control of tenants. Absolutely nothinglike today!

According to a Time’s Up! volunteer, one of the four arrested on mask charges was actually nabbed for “writing with chalk on the sidewalk,” and we’re told a police captain actually “leaped forward” over the barricade to arrest that demonstrator, who explains that he was arrested because he “placed his hand” on a barricade and didn’t have time to move away after a verbal warning. CityRoom confirms that their photographer did not witness the man attempting to jump the barricade. The NYPD maintains he did.

The anti-mask statute was passed as a response to the actions of rabble-rousing renters, seeking to prevent “distress sales” of their property by their landlords, dressing up as “Indians” to protect their rights and property. N.Y. Penal Law § 240.35(4) cropped back up in the news 11 years ago, when the KKK petitioned to wear masks protesting in the city. They were prohibited from doing so because of the statute, and sued. The USDC for the Southern District of New York sided with the KKK, and ruled the law unconstitutional, but not before protesters were arrested in 2002 for the same offense.

However, the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals, which included current Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, reversed that ruling in 2004, noting that because the KKK was already wearing a hood and robe, “the expressive force of the mask is, therefore, redundant.” The judges also noted that the “individual’s right to speech must always be balanced against the state’s interest in safety, and its right to regulate conduct that it legitimately considers potentially dangerous.”

Around 70 signs were reportedly stolen overnight by the NYPD as they maintained 24-hour surveillance of the area, which is being occupied by demonstrators in tents and sleeping bags.

I hope those arrested challenge their arrests on First Amendment grounds. This law seems to be constitutionally specious at best. If you’re arrested, attempt to document and/or remember everything. Then, call 212-679-6018 for the National Lawyer’s Guild, or 212-607-3300 for the ACLU. Write these numbers on your arm in sharpie.

I stand in solidarity with those occupying Wall Street. Stay strong.
Estoy en solidaridad con las personas que ocupan Wall Street. Por favor mantenga fuerte en la actualidad.

Filed under Occupy Wall Street politics NYPD police abuse US Constitution First Amendment New York Wall St. Day of Rage protest injustice inequality

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Ryan Adams, “New York, New York”

The disclaimer at the video gets me every time: “This video was shot on Friday September 7, 2001” 

On 9/11, I had finished Battle Stations in boot camp. That was my first official day as a U.S. Navy sailor. I’d be lying if I said the horror I felt then has dimmed in 10 years. I cannot imagine having lost a loved one that day, whether in New York City, Washington D.C., or Shanksville, Penn.

I worked for AFN (Armed Forces Network) and this was one of my most requested songs then. It was requested this Friday on my radio show. There’s something perfect about it. 

Filed under 9/11 Ryan Adams New York New York music in memory September 11th New York washington d.c. Shanksville

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In history there’s never been a civilization ever in history that has embraced homosexuality and turned away from traditional fidelity, traditional marriage, traditional child-rearing, and has survived. There isn’t one single civilization that has survived that openly embraced homosexuality. So you say, ‘what’s going to happen to America?’ Well if history is any guide, the same thing’s going to happen to us.

Pat Robertson, reminding us again that teh gayz are gonna destroy ‘mericuh. 

Same as it ever was, eh Pat? How many years have you been making this claim? Two things: First, throughout history, every civilization fails. See what I did there? No civilization will continue indefinitely. Second, Rome embraced Christianity approximately 150 years before it fell. So, Pat, by your logic Christianity is just as likely to have caused the fall of Rome.

Your move, pal.

(Source: godlessliberals.com)

Filed under Pat Robertson bigot politics new york GLBTQ GLBTQ Rights marriage equality Christianity

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I apologize for those who feel offended. I cannot deny, a person, a human being, a taxpayer, a worker, the people of my district and across this state, the State of New York, and those people who make this the great state that it is, the same rights that I have with my wife.
Sen. Mark J. Grisanti of Buffalo, a previous opponent of same-sex marriage explaining his decision to vote in favor of marriage equality.

(Source: The New York Times)

Filed under same-sex marriage politics marriage equality GLBTQ GLBTQ Rights New York Mark Grisanti