Cognitive Dissonance

"Democracy! Bah! When I hear that I reach for my feather boa!" - Allen Ginsberg

Posts tagged Rich versus poor

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The Real Housewives of Wall Street Why is the Federal Reserve forking over $220 million in bailout money to the wives of two Morgan Stanley bigwigs? 
By Matt TaibbiApril 12, 2011 9:55 AM ET
America has two national budgets, one official, one unofficial. The official budget is public record and hotly debated: Money comes in as taxes and goes out as jet fighters, DEA agents, wheat subsidies and Medicare, plus pensions and bennies for that great untamed socialist menace called a unionized public-sector workforce that Republicans are always complaining about. According to popular legend, we’re broke and in so much debt that 40 years from now our granddaughters will still be hooking on weekends to pay the medical bills of this year’s retirees from the IRS, the SEC and the Department of Energy.
Most Americans know about that budget. What they don’t know is that there is another budget of roughly equal heft, traditionally maintained in complete secrecy. After the financial crash of 2008, it grew to monstrous dimensions, as the government attempted to unfreeze the credit markets by handing out trillions to banks and hedge funds. And thanks to a whole galaxy of obscure, acronym-laden bailout programs, it eventually rivaled the “official” budget in size — a huge roaring river of cash flowing out of the Federal Reserve to destinations neither chosen by the president nor reviewed by Congress, but instead handed out by fiat by unelected Fed officials using a seemingly nonsensical and apparently unknowable methodology.
Read more…

The Real Housewives of Wall Street
Why is the Federal Reserve forking over $220 million in bailout money to the wives of two Morgan Stanley bigwigs?

By Matt TaibbiApril 12, 2011 9:55 AM ET

America has two national budgets, one official, one unofficial. The official budget is public record and hotly debated: Money comes in as taxes and goes out as jet fighters, DEA agents, wheat subsidies and Medicare, plus pensions and bennies for that great untamed socialist menace called a unionized public-sector workforce that Republicans are always complaining about. According to popular legend, we’re broke and in so much debt that 40 years from now our granddaughters will still be hooking on weekends to pay the medical bills of this year’s retirees from the IRS, the SEC and the Department of Energy.

Most Americans know about that budget. What they don’t know is that there is another budget of roughly equal heft, traditionally maintained in complete secrecy. After the financial crash of 2008, it grew to monstrous dimensions, as the government attempted to unfreeze the credit markets by handing out trillions to banks and hedge funds. And thanks to a whole galaxy of obscure, acronym-laden bailout programs, it eventually rivaled the “official” budget in size — a huge roaring river of cash flowing out of the Federal Reserve to destinations neither chosen by the president nor reviewed by Congress, but instead handed out by fiat by unelected Fed officials using a seemingly nonsensical and apparently unknowable methodology.

Read more…

Filed under Wall St. Matt Taibbi fraud bailout economic crisis economic collapse economic violence class war Rich versus Poor Rolling Stone Wall Street

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Wealth: When Will The 98% Tell The 2%, Enough Is Enough?

The governments of countries such as Greece, Ireland, Portugal and Spain are pushing for unpopular austerity measures, and richer countries such as the UK and France are trying to implement the same type of economic policies often by cutting social benefits and programs.

If austerity is the trend in Europe, it is certainly not the case in the United States. The US political and financial ruling class, which can be credited for starting the global financial meltdown of 2008, is still betting on the “virtues” of shock capitalism by cutting taxes and not cutting spending. What Congress did last night is quite simple: Our politicians made the decision to charge our common national credit card with a $700 billion gift to themselves and their real constituents, which are the wealthiest 2 percent Americans. And, once again, future generations will have to pick-up the astronomic tab. That is, of course, unless the United States goes completely bankrupt from 30 years of reckless financial and economic policies.

If you think bankruptcy is not a possibility, that’s just naive. 

Filed under Economics wealth America Rich versus poor

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My father got sick when I was 22… and I was poor. And my father had an ulcer, and it exploded, and, you know, all these toxins get in your blood - and basically, my father died 50 days after his ulcer. So I had a father get sick while I was poor.

My mother got sick while I was rich. I don’t really wanna get into to it, but my mother was sicker than my father, okay? And my mother’s alive. My mother’s fine, okay?

I remember going to the hospital to see my mother and wondering, was I in the right place? Like, this is a hotel! Like, it had a concierge, man! …If the average person really knew the discrepancy in the healthcare system, there’d be riots in the streets, okay? They would burn this motherfucker down.

CHRIS ROCK, responding to host Bill Maher asking if he ever went to the emergency room as his primary healthcare provider, on Real Time (via inothernews) (via magulartheimpalor) (via allyourlovearebelongtome) (via gertymac)

Reblog for all those dumbfucks who parade about announcing the US has the best healthcare system in the world. It’s a great system, if you’ve got the money.

(via ginger-gal)

This is so true.

(via tsg2010)

(via dr-grumbles)

(via sexualtictactoe)

Chris Rock is right. Don’t believe me? Visit a hospital in the poorest part of a city, then a private “medical park.” Then grab your pitchfork and torch.

Filed under Chris Rock Inequality health care heartless America rich versus poor

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Plutocracy Reborn: U.S. Wealth Inequality Gap Largest since 1928

The greater the disparity in wealth between the very rich and everyone else, the more unstable an economy becomes. Our nation has now created a larger gap in the distribution of wealth than the massive chasm that helped fuel the Great Depression. In 1928, one year before the global economic collapse, the wealthiest .001% of the U.S. population owned 892 times more than 90% of the nation’s citizens. Today, the top .001% of the U.S. population owns 976 times more than the entire bottom 90%. This is not sustainable, and makes for a very volatile economy. It would appear that the American empire is about to crash.

I’ve been saying this for awhile now…

(Source: facebook.com, via savagemike)

Filed under Plutocracy rich Rich versus Poor we're fucked with a capital fuck American Empire inequality economic violence

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BREAKING NEWS: Liberal concerns delay House vote on tax-cut deal

A liberal uprising over House procedures on Thursday was delaying a final vote on a far-reaching tax compromise brokered by the White House and Republican leaders.

Dozens of Democrats were demanding an opportunity to cast a vote to change an estate tax provision they view as too generous for the wealthy without also approving the rest of the package as passed by the Senate. That package contains a two-year extension of George W. Bush administration tax policies that benefit families at all income levels, including the very wealthiest Americans.

Democrats have complained for years about those provisions and want an opportunity to vote against them.

Senior Democrats said the delay was unlikely to derail the package, which is intended to prevent tax rates from rising in January for virtually every household.
… 
House leaders initially proposed adding a third vote that would have permitted liberals to vote for the amended version but then vote against sending it back to the Senate for further action.

But after huddling with Democratic leaders on the House floor, Rep. Peter A. DeFazio (D-Ore.) said liberals were pushing for a new and broader amendment that would include changes to the estate tax, substitute the president’s signature Making Work Pay tax credit for a two-percentage point reduction in the Social Security payroll tax and add a $250 bonus payment for Social Security recipients who are being denied a cost of living increase for the second year in a row.

And now they get a backbone? Well, better late than never…

Filed under Tax cuts Tax cuts don't solve everything Democrats Democrats gain a spine rich Rich versus Poor tax taxes The Obama Compromise *eye roll* Obama US House GOP

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Say NO to the Obama Tax Compromise!

Do not let Congress compromise with Obama. “The Compromise” is against everything the House Republican Leadership agreed to in the “Pledge to America.” This type of behind closed door politics is not what “We the People” voted for in November. Read more…

Sign Tea Party Patriots’ petition against “The Tax Deal” with Obama.

Don’t allow Congress to Compromise with Obama.

So this is a weird oppositeland… It’s now the “Obama Tax Compromise”

I think progressives should hijack this bitch and demand the removal of the Estate Tax compromise and capital gains compromise. Or something…

Filed under Obama tax compromise really?! Tea Party STFU Teabagger teabaggers Conservative conservatives tax taxes tax cut Tax cuts don't solve everything rich Rich versus Poor

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In fact, the only groups likely to face a tax increase are those near the bottom of the income scale — individuals who make less than $20,000 and families with earnings below $40,000.

Deal on Tax Cuts Will Aid Most, Especially Highest Earners - NYTimes (via brooklynmutt)

“It’s not our fault,” said the Republicans.  “It was President Obama who wanted to compromise!”

(via inothernews)

Awesome. I’m right there in the less than $20k category. Of course, those in power classify me as “less than” on a regular basis, so this shouldn’t be a shock. Who says the class war doesn’t exist?

(via hissingbooth)

Filed under Rich Rich versus Poor Fuck you Class war Tax cuts Tax cuts don't solve everything

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One Quarter of the Tax Cut deal's estimated $900 Billion goes to top 1% of earners.

savagemike:

chrisyack:

savagemike:

jasencomstock:

In fact, the only groups likely to face a tax increase are those near the bottom of the income scale — individuals who make less than $20,000 and families with earnings below $40,000.

[…]

To the wealthiest Americans, however, an assortment of breaks is available.

The plan includes a two-year “patch” for the alternative minimum tax, which is now paid by about 4 million taxpayers with income in the mid- to high six figures. Without the patch, more than 20 million additional taxpayers would have been liable for that tax.

The estate tax — which was allowed to lapse this year and was scheduled to resume at a rate of 55 percent on most assets above $1 million — will be reinstated under less onerous terms. Estates over $5 million will be subject to a 35 percent tax.

The proposal will also maintain the current rates on dividends and capital gains, averting scheduled increases to ordinary income and 20 percent, respectively.

The marginal tax rate on high incomes will also remain unchanged. The top brackets had been scheduled to increase to 36 percent and 39.6 percent, from 33 percent and 35 percent.

boo pee doo pee doo pee doo

So what we’ve got here is a possible tax increase on the very poorest Americans? Way to go.

Think of it this way. with out the wealthy people, none of the poor people get jobs. 

so suck it.

First of all, you’re 14 years old. You don’t know shit about job creation or economics, for that matter. Second, the rich are good at one thing: getting rich. No one got rich by creating more jobs; rather they get richer the more jobs they eliminate or ship overseas. Don’t be an idiot.

In regards to chrisyack:

"The number of Americans making $50 million or more, the top income category in the data, fell from 131 in 2008 to 74 last year. But that’s only part of the story.

The average wage in this top category increased from $91.2 million in 2008 to an astonishing $518.8 million in 2009. That’s nearly $10 million in weekly pay!

You read that right. In the Great Recession year of 2009 (officially just the first half of the year), the average pay of the very highest-income Americans was more than five times their average wages and bonuses in 2008. And even though their numbers shrank by 43 percent, this group’s total compensation was 3.2 times larger in 2009 than in 2008, accounting for 0.6 percent of all pay. These 74 people made as much as the 19 million lowest-paid people in America, who constitute one in every eight workers.

In this era, the incomes of the vast majority have barely grown while incomes at the top have soared. Reaganism has trimmed the base of the income ladder while placing a much heavier weight on the top. Narrowing the base while adding weight to the apex does not make a stable structure.”

Source: Tax.com
You can read my post on this here. My big hope for you is that you understand this before you grow up.

(via savagemike)

Filed under Taxes Tax Cut Tax cuts don't solve everything Rich Rich versus Poor

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This morning, in an interview with Tea Party Caucus leader Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN), ABC’s Good Morning America host George Stephanopoulos picked up on the discrepancy between caring about the deficit when adding to it helps the poor, but not when it helps the rich. Asked if she would support a compromise which extended both the tax cuts and the unemployment benefits, Bachmann said no, characterizing letting the tax cuts expire as a “massive tax increase,” while dismissing extending unemployment benefits as “massive spending”:

BACHMANN: As far as a compromise goes, I want to get the current tax policy as far into the future as we can, if we can only get it extended for two years, that’s great. But I don’t think the American people should have to pay for that to have some new massive spending tied to it. If that’s the case, I don’t think you’re going to see the Republicans go along with it.

STEPHANOPOULOS: But why is it OK for the wealthiest Americans earning over $250,000 a year — remember the President has called for extending all tax cuts for those under $250,000 — for them to get tax cuts extended but for people out of a job and needing unemployment benefits not to have their benefits extended?

BACHMANN: Well remember again what this is. It’s a massive tax increase and its on the people who are job creators. And people want to think that these are millionaires sitting in leather chairs lighting their cigars with $100 bills, that’s not what we’re talking about. These are people who are carpet layers who may be employed two or three other guys, or a plumber, maybe himself and his brother, and it’s $250,000 in gross sales for their business. Their the ones looking at massive tax increases. …That’s going to hurt more people than anything if we can’t have job creation. And this is a job killer if we raise taxes on the job creators.

Bachmann’s argument for tax extension is, in one word, “bogus.” As the Wonk Room’s Pat Garofalo points out, conservatives’ claim that the tax increase will hurt small businesses is “only accurate if you take an incredibly expansive view of what constitutes a small business.” In reality, “exceedingly few small businesses” would actually be affected by letting the tax cuts expire. Meanwhile, the cuts represent “the least effective tax or spending step for job creation,” according to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO). Every dollar spent extending the tax cuts results in just 10 cents to 40 cents of economic activity, the CBO found.

Unemployment extension for those seeking jobs, however, represents the biggest bang for the buck of any government stimulus policy. According to the CBO, “the economy would see output rise by between $0.70 to $1.90.” That is part of the reason why an overwhelming majority of Americans support extending unemployment benefits for more than 2 million Americans in need, regardless of its effect on the deficit.

What a miserable woman. Seriously. We’re going to spend massive amounts on the rich but fuck the unemployed. I really don’t believe that she sees the contradiction. 

Filed under Michele Bachmann GOP STFU STFU conservatives Tea Party Teabagger teabaggers teabaggery fuckery rich Rich versus Poor tax Tax cuts don't solve everything Republican republicans economic violence economic crisis economy unemployment

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Rand Paul, STFU

Rand Paul was saying there’s no rich and poor in America. And that we’re all interconnected. This was in defense of tax cuts for the rich.

Please, magical universe karma - transform Rand Paul into a non-white single mother looking for a job with a sick baby, overdue bills, and with no HS Diploma. Then ask him about the class war concept after he’s lived this life for 365 days. I’ve never lived this life, but I have friends currently living it. Just from my outside perspective, I see it’s hard. 

He needs to as well.

(h/t to Stephen Colbert for his excellent “The Word” segment on this)

Filed under perspective Rand Paul Douche Rich versus Poor There is a class war There Is Power In a Union Tax cuts don't solve everything