Cognitive Dissonance

"Democracy! Bah! When I hear that I reach for my feather boa!" - Allen Ginsberg

Posts tagged ask

31 notes

Anonymous asked: Gotta love violent gun nuts, every time they speak they prove that there are violent assholes out there who really, really shouldn't have access to a firearm.

Right? Thank you, anon, for demonstrating you can use the anon function for good and not evil.

Cheers,
Meg

Filed under ask anon

103 notes

Anonymous asked: Every libtard whore like you that is for gun grabbing needs a good raping or three. I guarantee you'll want to be armed next time skank.

Yeah, so I’ve actually been raped before. It was 10 years ago when I was in the Navy. My assailant was never prosecuted, though I pressed charges. And I’m still pro-gun control. I don’t want to take your guns. Well, maybe YOU personally, anon. I kind of think you shouldn’t be armed.

You don’t have an argument other than hoping women like me get raped, an act of sexual violence, on the off-chance it’ll change our minds. Bravo.

Did you know most rapes are committed by someone the person knows? At what point is it permissible to shoot my date — does he have to be getting pushy, denying no means no, or actually committing rape? Do I have to give him a warning? And considering the idea of proportional force — what if the court says I wasn’t in fear for my life? Oops, manslaughter.

Y’all give a fuck about violence against women when you think it fits your argument, but it really doesn’t. The presence of a gun in a home makes it much more likely a woman will be killed by it versus use it in self-defense. Based on your use of sexual slurs, I think this has more to do with a right-wing obsession with women’s “virtue,” a la purity rings in junior high. I must be willing to defend my honor at gunpoint, or I deserve what I get.

In conclusion, thanks again for making the gun control argument that much easier to make, genius.

Cheers,
Meg

Filed under anon ask gun control

83 notes

Anonymous asked: If we have guns on campus then maybe liberal cunts like you won't come to Wyoming. People like you come in and fuck everything up. Just remember the only gun free zone is campus. Everywhere else is fair game. Feel safe? I carry everywhere and my girl feels safe. You shouldn't because a bad guy with a gun won't wait for the good guys with guns to show up. Find yourself a real man to teach you some respect bitch. See you in class next week.

Ah yes. Because “real men” prove their masculinity with vague threats, misogynistic insults, and bragging about their boomsticks — anonymously, of course.

Yeah, I feel safe. And who’s gonna teach me some respect? You? That’s laughable. And if you do go to class with me, yes, I’ll see you next week — unarmed, thankfully. You sound like a dudebro with a hairtrigger temper.

Oh, and did you know you’re much more likely to shoot your girlfriend than an attacker? I’d hate to think how you act towards her if this is how you talk to women in general.

As for the Wyoming argument, get over yourself. There’s no birthright here. And the over 80% Republican state legislature rejected even considering lifting the ban on concealed carry on campus. Maybe it’s because they’re worried folks like yourself will disregard a gun’s use as a tool for defense and instead view said weapon as a solution in search of a problem.

In conclusion, I could write you a big, long answer with links and such about why guns on campus are a terrible idea, but I’ll just thank you for making that argument for me. About the last thing we need at UW is armed, misogynistic xenophobe fucks like you.

Cheers,
Meg

Filed under gun control anon ask

49 notes

On funding abortion

Rebloggable by request:

Hi I’m panicking right now because I think I may be pregnant and I have no means for an abortion and it’s early enough for an abortion pill but it costs around $300-$800 and I don’t have that kind of money. Is there anything I can do because I know planned parenthood still makes you pay. Please if your followers have any suggestions about what I can do monetary wise it would be a big help.

Anonymous

 Meg at Cognitive Dissonance

First, call the closest clinic to you. Ask if they know about private funds. Explain your situation. If they can’t help, call as far away as you can feasibly travel if you have to — they’re usually willing to direct you. Make sure you are not calling a crisis pregnancy center — these places will mislead you. Also, try the state chapter of NARAL where you live.

If that doesn’t work, hit up the site for the National Network of Abortion Funds. Here’s the link for funds in almost all 50 states. Also, visit the Feminist Women’s Health Center, National Abortion Federation, and the Guttmacher Institute for more information.

Followers, feel free to chime in! In your case, it sounds like there’s time to get around most restrictions, but not much. I hope this helps. If it doesn’t, write me back here or at my email, meglanker@gmail.com and we’ll see what we can dig up.

Take care.

Cheers,

Meg

ETA: American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
*as our contributor wrote, “religious-based link in there, however. Review with objectivity”

Filed under Abortion Information You should bookmark this anon ask important reproductive rights women's rights NARAL National Network of Abortion funds Guttmacher Institute

66 notes

Anonymous asked: How can you live in Laramie knowing what happened there?

How can you assume I wouldn’t want to stay and continue the great work of tireless fellow activists who brought domestic partnerships and nondiscrimination legislation to the floor of the Wyoming Legislature for the first time in history?

I’ve stood with fellow Wyomingites as we work for equality without asterisks in The Equality State. I’ve felt my spirit soar when these bills were heard in committee, when equality takes two steps forward, when we hear pastors testify God loves everyone, and we choke up with tears of joy at every “Aye” vote.

I’ve swallowed nauseous bile at the slurs hurled at Rep. Cathy Connolly of Laramie, hateful words tumbling clumsily from the mouths of her fellow lawmakers who swear to their version of God it isn’t personal, but she is one of THOSE people. The religious right testifies that my friends and loved ones are broken and destroying society, and I just want to shake every zealot and yell in their faces that all “those people” want is the same beautiful chance at marriage that I’ve had and to not be fired from their jobs or denied an apartment because their wedding photos feature two people of the same gender embracing.

I’ve wept bitter tears with my fellow activists and allies, as we see our efforts for that session end in less time than it takes to make toast, as the “nay” votes win out again.

And then we celebrate because WE GOT CLOSER. We work to make Wyoming a safe place for LGBTQA people. And we gear up to do it all again because, as Amy Ray wrote, “tolerance ain’t acceptance.” We keep fighting and fighting and fighting, not just because of what happened here — it could happen anywhere — but because of what we know CAN happen here.

How dare you.

Cheers,
Meg

Filed under anon ask Laramie LGBT LGBTQA politics

60 notes

On racial slurs: Still racist with an “a”

Rebloggable by request:

So, my boyfriend and I just got into an argument because he claims that him (a white man) using ‘n****’ isn’t problematic. That essentially ‘n****’ isn’t bad and that ‘even black guys use it’ so it isn’t a big deal and that it doesn’t hold any negative connotation. I’m trying to keep my cool, but the more he talks the angrier I get. Help?

imageAnonymous

Meg at Cognitive Dissonance:

He is white, using a racist slur, and thinks it’s OK. Where’s the debate?

Wait, are you dating Lisa Lampanelli? She thinks it’s a-OK too.

Guess what? It’s not. Dion the Socialist wrote an excellent post about this issue, based on Lampanelli’s recent use of the word.

Here’s the thing: Your boyfriend is a white guy using a word that once sat only in the dominion of the oppressor’s vocabulary as a slur to put the oppressed, enslaved peoples in their place and to remind them later of their oppression. But it’s OK for him to use it because the same people who were are institutionally oppressed still today use it, often as a slang term to recapture it for themselves? Did I miss anything?

Nope, sorry, your boyfriend is supporting overt racism with his colorblind bullshit argument. Show him this, and he can message me about how we’re all the same and it’s just a word, blah blah blah. Or better yet, ask him if he’d strike up a conversation with a black person he’d never met before and drop that into casual conversation.

If he says yes, he’s either lying, or a truly ignorant, rotten person. You have every right to be angry about this. I’m not going to mince words here. You’re either on the side of tacit oppression or you’re fighting it. Guess which side he’s on?

Cheers,

Meg

Filed under anon ask rebloggable race racism dear white people please stop using the n-word dion the socialist lisa lampanelli oppression institutionalized racism

81 notes

Anonymous asked: I have a question. I never liked rap until I heard Macklemore. And I listened to some other stuff, and so the only rap I like is by white people. I wrote an informative persuasion speech for my Public Speaking class about how black people started rap but white people made it better because it's not all gangster. I got docked for points because my teacher (a black prof) said it was racist, that it's in the syllabus hate speech won't be tolerated, and it's not a persuasion speech. Who's right?

You are definitely in the wrong here. So. Very. Wrong.

Your opinion is just that — an opinion. If you’re doing an informative persuasion speech, I’m going to guess your professor wanted you to cite sources. I don’t even know what sources you’d cite to suggest that white people were able to take rap and make it better because it’s not “all gangster.” I’m gonna guess Stormfront. It was Stormfront, right?

And that leads to the whole racism thing…

Yes, your professor is right. Let me quote another white rapper, Eminem, as our starting point:

“I am the worst thing since Elvis Presley / to do Black Music so selfishly / and use it to get myself wealthy (Hey) / there’s a concept that works” — “Without Me”

There’s a long history of cultural appropriation with Black music and culture, whether it’s rap, blues, rock n’ roll, etc. (Harlem Shake anyone?) What do you think birthed rock n’ roll? It just fell out of the sky like manna from White Jesus? Bullshit. I encourage you to pick up this book, The Soul of Rock ‘N Roll: A History of African Americans in Rock Music.

Now, on to rap. First off, I’ll help you with the whole hip hop white people like thing. Brian over at Cats and Beer complied a list of hip hop songs for white people and damn, if it isn’t the truth from what I’ve seen with white people who say, “Oh yeah, I LOVE rap!”

In all seriousness, examine what you’re saying up there. You like rap that white people have done because it’s “not all gangster” — did you stop to consider that perhaps the music you hear from people of color has something to do with their real-life and their struggles? Yeah, there’s gangsta rap, but check your privilege at the door anon — I’m guessing your objections don’t come from growing up in and seeing that as a part of everyday life.

However, some rap and hip hop IS problematic itself with the derogatory language towards women, LGBTQ people, and Black women in particular, but there’s also the same degradation in rock music — largely by white men, and for decades. On my radio show, we came to the conclusion that Death Cab for Cutie’s, “I Will Posses Your Heart” is the ultimate “nice guy” song:

“You reject my advances and desperate pleas / I won’t let you let me down so easily / So easily”

Let me? How sweet of you Ben Gibbard, let me have hundred of your twee lil’ babies!

Dr. Edward Rhymes wrote an excellent piece about rap being scapegoated by the dominant culture in America called “Caucasian please! America’s Cultural Double Standard for Misogyny and Racism.” An excerpt:

In this composition I will not be addressing the whole of hip-hop and rap, but rather hardcore and gangsta rap. It is my assertion that the mainstream media and political pundits — right and left — have painted rap and hip-hop with a very broad brush. Let me be perfectly clear, hardcore and gangsta rap is not listened to, watched, consumed or supported in my home and never has been. I will not be an apologist for anything that chooses to frame the dialogue about Black women (and women in general) and Black life in morally bankrupt language and reprehensible symbols.

In the wake of MSNBC’s and CBS’s firing of Don Imus, the debate over misogyny, sexism and racism has now taken flight — or submerged, depending on your point of view. There are many, mostly white, people who believe that Imus was a fall guy and he is receiving blame and criticism for what many rap artists do continually in the lyrics and videos: debase and degrade Black women. A Black guest on an MSNBC news program even went as far as to say, “Where would a 66 year-old white guy even had heard the phrase nappy-headed ho” — alluding to hip-hop music’s perceived powerful influence upon American culture and life (and apparently over the radio legend as well) — and by so doing gave a veneer of truth to the theory that rap music is the main culprit to be blamed for this contemporary brand of chauvinism.

However, I concur with bell hooks, the noted sociologist and black-feminist activist who said that “to see gangsta rap as a reflection of dominant values in our culture rather than as an aberrant ‘pathological’ standpoint, does not mean that a rigorous feminist critique of the sexist and misogyny expressed in this music is not needed. Without a doubt black males, young and old, must be held politically accountable for their sexism.

Yet this critique must always be contextualized or we risk making it appear that the behavior this thinking supports and condones — rape, male violence against women, etc. — is a black male thing. And this is what is happening. Young black males are forced to take the ‘heat’ for encouraging, via their music, the hatred of and violence against women that is a central core of patriarchy.”

How about that for an informative persuasion speech?

Not liking rap isn’t racist. I dig Macklemore — “Same Love” and “Thrift Shop” are catchy as hell. Saying the only rap you like is by certain artists who are white, well, it’s awkwardly walking a fine line and some people will assume you’re racist. Claiming white people took rap and made it better? Fuck, anon, you should be grateful you just got points taken off. You assume that rap by people of color is just gangster? Yeah, that’s racist but sadly, I bet there are a few in your class that agree with you. Again, your professor is right. It wasn’t a persuasion speech. It was (likely) racist. I say likely because I obviously didn’t hear it, but I seriously can’t think of a way in which it wouldn’t be racist.

And lest you think all rap by white artists is a-OK, please, let me remind of 3OH!3’s “Don’t Trust Me” — which holds the honor of being the only song I have ever refused to play as a request on my own radio show.

In conclusion, check out Sarah Jones, “Your Revolution”:

Hopefully you’ve learned something here, and your next speech is just a simple how-to instructional speech. May I suggest how not to be an ignorant tool as the topic? Re-read the above if you have any questions.

Class dismissed.

Cheers,

Meg

Filed under anon ask racism cultural appropriation misogynist misogyny

8 notes

Anonymous asked: I don't want to be nosy, but are you doing alright financially? I know you just had your appendix out and had trouble a month or two ago with making ends meet, and you're too awesome to run outta dough.

Thank you for asking! No, we’re pretty shaky at the moment. I had to take nearly two weeks off from work. We will likely have difficulty paying rent on the first, we’re behind on the car payment, and the bill hasn’t arrived yet.

I was going to put up a donation ask once the bills arrived for the surgeon and the hospital. I might be able to get some written off, and I had the less-then-stellar Student Medical Insurance from UW, so I’m not sure how much I owe at this point. My in-laws were kind enough to help some, but it’s likely we will fall behind in the next two weeks.

Two steps forward, one step back. And sometimes it’s the other way around. If there is anyone out there who is willing to help us, I would be very grateful. We were just recovering from a pretty nasty financial hit when I needed emergency surgery. If you are able to donate, please use the box on the sidebar or click here (through March 7), or you can use my PayPal email: meglanker@gmail.com.

I’ll be posting a new page via WePay because ChipIn is shutting down on March 7th. I’ll also be keeping readers up to date.

Thank you to everyone in advance. I know we’re going to be hanging off a cliff in the next week or two, and if you want to throw us a rope, we would be incredibly grateful. 

Cheers,

Meg

Filed under please help anon ask box ask donate

24 notes

perksofpilotry asked: I worked at the Sheridan Perkins for about three weeks in my first year of college. It was absolutely awful. I hated that place and I still don't like going there.

I almost got fired because I fainted in the middle of Mother’s Day breakfast service. I tried to call in sick with a fever of 102°F and they told me to come in or be fired. I did, and at about 11:30 AM, I turned to tell a coworker that I felt strange. The next thing I know, this kind old lady is asking for cool rags and an ambulance. I was scheduled from 8AM-8PM, and while I was in the ER, my phone rang constantly. I finally told them I wouldn’t be back that day because I had a concussion and the flu.

The manager said I was fired if I didn’t come back and do my side work, and he was pooling my tips I left behind among everyone. He was talking about credit card tips from already cashed-out tables. So I went back and rolled silverware while on painkillers. I kept messing up, so they sent me home and erased all my hours for the next two weeks since I “obviously didn’t want to work.”

I worked there for two years total until I just couldn’t take it any longer. I got stiffed on a party of 17, and I quit the next day.

It was the worst place I ever worked, and as a floor leader, I still made only $2.63/hr. Glad you only stayed three weeks. And fuck people who don’t tip. Truly. Even with truly shit service I tip because you never know who’s having the worst day ever, who’s ill, or who just started yesterday.

Cheers,
Meg

Filed under minimum wage poverty Perkins worst job ever ask ask box restaurant

14 notes

stringharmonics asked: As a 6th generation Wyomingite (My family settled here from Scotland in the 1800's) I find it offensive that Rep. Hunt thinks ignorance is not only a staple of the citizens of Wyoming, but an inherited trait. I also find it hilariously ironic that to get to Wyoming, you had to move from out-of-state, no matter what time period you did it in.

Right? Unless you were an original homesteader, and by that I mean a member of one of the many American Indian tribes that occupied the land before we white folk rolled in. 

Rep. Hans Hunt, a shining example of birthright entitlement. Just a quick hint: You know how Wyoming (at least some of it) claims Dick Cheney?

Yeah, he was born in Nebraska. Sen. Mike Enzi is from the West coast, Sen. John Barrasso is from Pennsylvania, and our treasured former Sen. Malcom Wallop was from New York City. Those are just a few “Wyomingites” I could think of off the top of my head who fail Rep. Hunt’s purity test.

In conclusion, much to Rep. Hunt’s dismay, the whole monarchy/birthright thing fell out of fashion awhile ago, and believing someone should leave for paying attention to what’s going on in the state capitol — that’s the antithesis of government of the people, by the people, and for the people.

Cheers,

Meg

Filed under Wyoming ask Hans Hunt Politics

10 notes

b-rar asked: My school gave me a financial aid award in the amount of $0.00. I was required to log into the portal to "accept" it.

I would be so fucking angry. I just can’t deal with that kind of fuckery.

Cheers,

Meg

Filed under b-rar ask ask box

11 notes

Anonymous asked: My pell grants are 5500 a year.

Why would you write in to tell me that? To gloat? 

Piss off, anon. Not all of us are as lucky as you.

Cheers,

Meg

Filed under Anonymous ask ask box

8 notes

Anonymous asked: why is your pell grant so low? i thought pell grants were $2400 a semester? did congress cut funding to it or something?

They are $2775 per semester, but yes. They’ve been cut for many students.

Here’s an explanation:

When Republicans took the House majority in 2011, the first piece of legislation passed included $5.7 billion cut to Pell Grants, though the bill never made it through the Senate. Later, however, Pell Grants were cut during the debt ceiling debacle in the summer of 2011.

Then, in December 2011, when a government shutdown was looming, the deal congressional leaders struck included a provision which preserved the maximum Pell Grant, but reduced eligibility to use them from 18 semesters to 12. An estimated 62,000 to 100,000 students could be hurt by this change.

It doesn’t matter if you went full-time, part-time, or somewhere in the middle — if you use the Pell, it counts toward your limit. I knew I had 18 semesters, so when I was going to school part-time and working full-time, I expected it not to be a problem.

I’m not sure what wizardry financial aid did in the fall, but I wasn’t even supposed to get it then. But it ended this semester, not only for me, but several other people I know who are parents going part-time, or those who’ve worked full-time like I did.

Cheers,

Meg

Filed under Anonymous ask ask box

57 notes

Anonymous asked: Do you actually know what all those articles mean or say? You're a DJ. Or whatever you are.

Well, I have a degree in psychology, will graduate with my degree in Criminal Justice this spring, and I focused primarily on the intersection between social psychology, policy, and the law in my undergrad research. I also researched various forms of media and its effects on different demographics and balanced it all with a pre-law concentration focusing on conflict theory and economics.

So yes, I’m a DJ, but I also understand the implications of the articles and their methodology/conclusions.

In conclusion, piss off.

Cheers,

Meg

Filed under Anonymous ask ask box