Cognitive Dissonance

"Democracy! Bah! When I hear that I reach for my feather boa!" - Allen Ginsberg

Posts tagged equality

63 notes

Today’s SCOTUS ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act IS historic, don’t get me wrong.

And Scalia’s dissent IS full of quotable bitter lemons.

However, as allies for queer and trans* communities, and people of color, our work is not done. There’s the recently-overturned crucial aspects to the Voting Rights Act. And DOMA doesn’t address inequalities faced every day by queer and trans* people.

So yes, let’s celebrate, but let’s not forget queer youth fighting for a place to stay, trans* people fighting to keep their jobs, or people of color fighting to keep their right to vote.

The Pledge of Allegiance still ends, in my opinion, with: “…and liberty and justice for SOME.” So as we celebrate DOMA today, remember, there’s much more work to be done tomorrow.

Cheers,
Meg

Filed under defense of marriage act doma equality lgbtq scotus politics marriage equality

116 notes

Feminist snark from 1915, courtesy of Roqayah Chamseddine on Twitter. Anna Breslaw of Jezebel writes:

FYI: [Alice] Duer Miller was a poet, writer and Barnard College alum whose name appears in the first-ever issue of the New Yorker as an advisory editor. I haven’t even put pants on today.

Alice Duer Miller wrote biting poems about a “woman’s place” in the early 1900s. A collection of her poems, titled Are Women People?, is available for free on the Project Gutenberg website. They’re just as relevant today as they were nearly a century ago. Let that sink in for a moment. I’ll post three here:

The Revolt of Mother
(“Every true woman feels — ”—Speech of almost any Congressman.)


I am old-fashioned, and I think it rightThat man should know, by Nature’s laws eternal,The proper way to rule, to earn, to fight,And exercise those functions called paternal;But even I a little bit rebelAt finding that he knows my job as well.
At least he’s always ready to expound it,Especially in legislative hall,The joys, the cares, the halos that surround it,"How women feel"—he knows that best of all.In fact his thesis is that no one canKnow what is womanly except a man.
I am old-fashioned, and I am contentWhen he explains the world of art and scienceAnd government—to him divinely sent—I drink it in with ladylike compliance.But cannot listen—no, I’m only human—While he instructs me how to be a woman.
— Alice Duer Miller
Feminism


"Mother, what is a Feminist?"
"A Feminist, my daughter,
Is any woman now who cares
To think about her own affairs
As men don’t think she oughter.”
— Alice Duer Miller
Why We Oppose Pockets for Women
1. Because pockets are not a natural right.
2. Because the great majority of women do not want pockets. If they did they would have them.
3. Because whenever women have had pockets they have not used them.
4. Because women are required to carry enough things as it is, without the additional burden of pockets.
5. Because it would make dissension between husband and wife as to whose pockets were to be filled.
6. Because it would destroy man’s chivalry toward woman, if he did not have to carry all her things in his pockets.
7. Because men are men, and women are women. We must not fly in the face of nature.
8. Because pockets have been used by men to carry tobacco, pipes, whiskey flasks, chewing gum and compromising letters. We see no reason to suppose that women would use them more wisely.
— Alice Duer Miller

Feminist snark from 1915, courtesy of Roqayah Chamseddine on Twitter. Anna Breslaw of Jezebel writes:

FYI: [Alice] Duer Miller was a poet, writer and Barnard College alum whose name appears in the first-ever issue of the New Yorker as an advisory editor. I haven’t even put pants on today.

Alice Duer Miller wrote biting poems about a “woman’s place” in the early 1900s. A collection of her poems, titled Are Women People?, is available for free on the Project Gutenberg website. They’re just as relevant today as they were nearly a century ago. Let that sink in for a moment. I’ll post three here:

The Revolt of Mother

(“Every true woman feels — ”—Speech of almost any Congressman.)

I am old-fashioned, and I think it right
That man should know, by Nature’s laws eternal,
The proper way to rule, to earn, to fight,
And exercise those functions called paternal;
But even I a little bit rebel
At finding that he knows my job as well.

At least he’s always ready to expound it,
Especially in legislative hall,
The joys, the cares, the halos that surround it,
"How women feel"—he knows that best of all.
In fact his thesis is that no one can
Know what is womanly except a man.

I am old-fashioned, and I am content
When he explains the world of art and science
And government—to him divinely sent—
I drink it in with ladylike compliance.
But cannot listen—no, I’m only human—
While he instructs me how to be a woman.

— Alice Duer Miller

Feminism

"Mother, what is a Feminist?"

"A Feminist, my daughter,

Is any woman now who cares

To think about her own affairs

As men don’t think she oughter.”

— Alice Duer Miller

Why We Oppose Pockets for Women

1. Because pockets are not a natural right.

2. Because the great majority of women do not want pockets. If they did they would have them.

3. Because whenever women have had pockets they have not used them.

4. Because women are required to carry enough things as it is, without the additional burden of pockets.

5. Because it would make dissension between husband and wife as to whose pockets were to be filled.

6. Because it would destroy man’s chivalry toward woman, if he did not have to carry all her things in his pockets.

7. Because men are men, and women are women. We must not fly in the face of nature.

8. Because pockets have been used by men to carry tobacco, pipes, whiskey flasks, chewing gum and compromising letters. We see no reason to suppose that women would use them more wisely.

— Alice Duer Miller

Filed under Alice Duer Miller Feminism Poetry Politics Satire Women's suffrage voting ebook women's rights equality

10 notes

An oldie, but goodie — it’s the poster I designed two years ago for this fight.
But remember this: In 2011, Domestic Partnerships never even moved from committee. It died for lack of a second to be heard.
This poster was used in demonstrating against the anti-gay bills, which didn’t even get filed this year because there was no one who would sponsor them.
We still have the Non-discrimination bill that will come before the senate.
This is the closest and farthest we’ve ever come. We know for sure who our friends and opposition are, and we’ll be back.
I promise.

An oldie, but goodie — it’s the poster I designed two years ago for this fight.

But remember this: In 2011, Domestic Partnerships never even moved from committee. It died for lack of a second to be heard.

This poster was used in demonstrating against the anti-gay bills, which didn’t even get filed this year because there was no one who would sponsor them.

We still have the Non-discrimination bill that will come before the senate.

This is the closest and farthest we’ve ever come. We know for sure who our friends and opposition are, and we’ll be back.

I promise.

Filed under LGBTQ Wyoming Equality Marriage Equality Politics News gay rights Wyoming Legislature

46 notes

Happy Birthday, Phyllis Schlafly!

I read some of your ramblings in high school, fifteen or so years ago. And I’d like to thank you for helping to mold me as a progressive activist, and making me understand why the ERA is a big deal.

In your incoherent desire to see women in my generation retreat from a battle our grandmothers and mothers fought, I felt my spine and my resolve harden to KEEP PUSHING FURTHER. This serves me well when I think nothing I do matters. I look up quotes from you, like this 2007 gem: “By getting married, the woman has consented to sex, and I don’t think you can call it rape.” AND THE FIRE IN MY BELLY RAGES.

So Phyllis, bravo on being the antihero at best, and the villain at worst. You’re sixty years older than me, and a century behind. I hope you sleep fitfully tonight, stuffed with birthday cake and bile, knowing the War on Women is far from over, and the women of my generation have begun picking up the artillery of those who came before us.

We come from all walks of life, all ages, all races, ethnic backgrounds, religions, sexual orientations, and all points on the spectrum of gender.

And we will outlive you by decades and outrun you by miles.

Sleep tight, Phyllis.

Filed under Feminism Phyllis Schlafly women ERA equality politics progressive conservative gender women's rights reproductive rights

7 notes

Dear Colorado,
This sign was first held by now-Wyo. State Senator Chris Rothfuss in 2009 when state DOMA HJR 17 was up for vote. It was defeated.
It was posted in Cheyenne in 2011 for opposition to state DOMA HB 74. It was defeated.
We’re pretty good at advocating against bigotry in Wyoming. We’ll see you at your special session regarding civil unions. That sign has a blank back, and I’ll take it off the wall.
Cheers,
Meg
(Taken with Instagram)

Dear Colorado,

This sign was first held by now-Wyo. State Senator Chris Rothfuss in 2009 when state DOMA HJR 17 was up for vote. It was defeated.

It was posted in Cheyenne in 2011 for opposition to state DOMA HB 74. It was defeated.

We’re pretty good at advocating against bigotry in Wyoming. We’ll see you at your special session regarding civil unions. That sign has a blank back, and I’ll take it off the wall.

Cheers,

Meg

(Taken with Instagram)

Filed under Colorado Civil Unions GLBTQ politics equality Wyoming gay rights GLBTQ rights expect us

920 notes

He is rigid and a homophobic. He said, ‘I want a constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage,’ and they said, ‘Well, what about the people who are already married?’ And he said, ‘Well, they would be nullified.’ I mean what is, what’s human, what’s kind about that? We’re all human beings, we all know or love somebody who’s gay or lesbian so what the hell is that about? To me it’s startling and borders on disgust.

Former US Senator Al Simpson, (R-Wyo.) on Rick Santorum. In 2011, Simpson emailed me this statement on HB 74, a bill to ban recognition of same-sex marriage in Wyoming:

"I can’t imagine anything more inhuman, insensitive and unfair. Wyoming people believe in getting the government out of their lives. We cherish the precious right of privacy, and the precious right to be left alone. Why can’t we extend that to all our other fellow human beings?"

If the GOP adopted that line of thinking nationally, it would be a radical step forward.

Though Simpson voted for the Defense of Marriage Act [DOMA] in 1996, he has since supported marriage equality. Good on him for calling out Santorum’s homophobia. 

(Source: cognitivedissonance)

Filed under GOP Al Simpson Alan Simpson politics homophobia Rick Santorum same-sex marriage marriage equality Republican Republicans GLBTQ equality

123 notes

I get a kick out of folks who call for equality now, the people on the left, ‘Well, equality, we want equality.’ Where do you think this concept of equality comes from? It doesn’t come from Islam. It doesn’t come from the East and Eastern religions, where does it come from? It comes from the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, that’s where it comes from.

So don’t claim his rights, don’t claim equality as that gift from God and then go around and say, ‘Well, we don’t have to pay attention to what God wants us to do. We don’t have to pay attention to God’s moral laws.’ If your rights come from God, then you have an obligation to live responsibly in conforming with God’s laws, and our founders said so, right?

Rick Santorum, at his last town hall meeting before the South Carolina primary.

I’ve heard the argument that rights come from God before. But the equality thing, goddamn. That’s a whole new layer of fuckery.

But whatever. I’ll play.

  • "A woman should learn in quietness and full submission. I do not permit a woman to teach or to have authority over a man; she must be silent. For Adam was formed first, then Eve. And Adam was not the one deceived; it was the woman who was deceived and became a sinner. But womena will be saved through childbearing—if they continue in faith, love and holiness with propriety." 1 Timothy 2:11-15

Or…

  • "Let all who are under the yoke of slavery regard their masters as worthy of all honor, so that the name of God and the teaching may not be blasphemed. Those who have believing masters must not be disrespectful to them on the ground that they are members of the church; rather they must serve them all the more, since those who benefit by their service are believers and beloved. Teach and urge these duties. Whoever teaches otherwise and does not agree with the sound words of our Lord Jesus Christ and the teaching that is in accordance with godliness, is conceited, understanding nothing, and has a morbid craving for controversy and for disputes about words." 1 Timothy 6:1-4

Or…

  • "But I would have you know, that the head of every man is Christ; and the head of the woman is the man; and the head of Christ is God." 1 Corinthians 11:3
  • "For the man is not of the woman; but the woman of the man. Neither was the man created for the woman; but the woman for the man." 1 Corinthians 11:8-9
  • "Let your women keep silence in the churches: for it is not permitted unto them to speak; but they are commanded to be under obedience, as also saith the law. And if they will learn any thing, let them ask their husbands at home." 1 Corinthians 14:34-35
  • "Give me any plague, but the plague of the heart: and any wickedness, but the wickedness of a woman." Eccles. 25:13
  • "Of the woman came the beginning of sin, and through her we all die." Eccles. 25:22
  • "The whoredom of a woman may be known in her haughty looks and eyelids." Eccles. 26:9
  • "Better is the churlishness of a man than a courteous woman, a woman, I say, which bringeth shame and reproach." Eccles. 42:14
  • "One of illegitimate birth shall not enter the congregation of the Lord." Deuteronomy 23:2

I’m done. In general, organized religion does not have the best track record of promoting equality. I imagine Rick Santorum has a different version of equality than the one found in the US Constitution. That’s the definition I follow.

And that’s one big reason Santorum should never hold public office again. He loves to rail about Iran’s unjust theocracy. Listening to Santorum talk, it seems he’s taken notes for his imaginary presidency.

(Source: cognitivedissonance)

Filed under Rick Santorum Religion politics equality Ow my brain Inequality gender GOP Republican South Carolina

125 notes

canisfamiliaris:

Wyoming Governor Nellie Tayloe Ross assumed office on this day in 1925, becoming the first female Governor in the United States. (She is the only woman ever to have served as Governor of Wyoming.)
She later became the first female Director of the United States Mint, a position she held for 20 years.At the 1928 Democratic National Convention, she received 31 nominating votes from 10 states to be Vice President of the U.S. She later served as Vice-Chair of the Democratic National Committee.

I love that Wyoming is The Equality State and that we had the first female governor. We’ve had quite a few firsts in Wyoming:

First Women to Vote: John A. Campbell,  Wyoming’s first Territorial Governor, signed  a bill December 10, 1869 making Wyoming  the first state to grant women the right to vote.
First Woman Justice of the Peace: Esther Hobart Morris was appointed February  17, 1870 in South Pass City.
First Woman Statewide Elected Official: Estelle Reel Meyer was elected as Superintendent of Public Instruction in 1894.
First All Woman Jury: The first all  woman jury was sworn in March 7, 1870 in  Laramie.
First Town in America to be Governed Entirely by Women: The city of Jackson, from 1920 to 1921, had a woman mayor, town council and town marshal. One of the councilwomen defeated her husband for her council seat.
First Woman Governor in the U.S.: Nellie Tayloe Ross was elected to complete the term of her husband who died in office. She served from 1925 to 1927. In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed her the first woman to head the U.S. Mint, a position she held until 1953.
First Woman Bailiff: In 1870, Martha  Symons-Boies-Atkinson of Albany County  was appointed the first woman bailiff in the  world.
First Business West of the Missouri River: In 1834, Fort William was erected at the confluence of the Laramie and North Platte Rivers by veteran fur traders William Sublette and Robert Campbell. Thus, the first trading post west of the Missouri River was established.
First National Park: In 1872, Congress  named Yellowstone National Park in  northwestern Wyoming as the first national  park in the world.
First State to Have a County Public  Library System: The Laramie County  Public Library System was organized in  August of 1886.
First National Forest: By an Act signed  by President Benjamin Harrison in 1891,  Shoshone National Forest became the first  national forest. Wyoming now has 9 national  forests.
First Ranger Station: Wapiti Ranger  Station was established in the Shoshone  National Forest in 1891.
First National Monument: Devils  Tower in northeastern Wyoming was  designated the first national monument by  President Theodore Roosevelt in 1906.
First Artificially Lit Evening Football Game: The first interscholastic football game to be played under artificial light took place in Midwest, Wyoming in 1925.

We still have quite a ways to go when it comes to becoming the Equality State in full though. Every year, we have to beat back bills limiting reproductive rights and attacking the rights of the GLBTQ community. It’s in the spirit of a state that had the first female governor, and that pragmatically granted women the right to vote to gain statehood, that we continue to fight. 

canisfamiliaris:

Wyoming Governor Nellie Tayloe Ross assumed office on this day in 1925, becoming the first female Governor in the United States. (She is the only woman ever to have served as Governor of Wyoming.)

She later became the first female Director of the United States Mint, a position she held for 20 years.At the 1928 Democratic National Convention, she received 31 nominating votes from 10 states to be Vice President of the U.S. She later served as Vice-Chair of the Democratic National Committee.

I love that Wyoming is The Equality State and that we had the first female governor. We’ve had quite a few firsts in Wyoming:

First Women to Vote: John A. Campbell, Wyoming’s first Territorial Governor, signed a bill December 10, 1869 making Wyoming the first state to grant women the right to vote.

First Woman Justice of the Peace: Esther Hobart Morris was appointed February 17, 1870 in South Pass City.

First Woman Statewide Elected Official: Estelle Reel Meyer was elected as Superintendent of Public Instruction in 1894.

First All Woman Jury: The first all woman jury was sworn in March 7, 1870 in Laramie.

First Town in America to be Governed Entirely by Women: The city of Jackson, from 1920 to 1921, had a woman mayor, town council and town marshal. One of the councilwomen defeated her husband for her council seat.

First Woman Governor in the U.S.: Nellie Tayloe Ross was elected to complete the term of her husband who died in office. She served from 1925 to 1927. In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed her the first woman to head the U.S. Mint, a position she held until 1953.

First Woman Bailiff: In 1870, Martha Symons-Boies-Atkinson of Albany County was appointed the first woman bailiff in the world.

First Business West of the Missouri River: In 1834, Fort William was erected at the confluence of the Laramie and North Platte Rivers by veteran fur traders William Sublette and Robert Campbell. Thus, the first trading post west of the Missouri River was established.

First National Park: In 1872, Congress named Yellowstone National Park in northwestern Wyoming as the first national park in the world.

First State to Have a County Public Library System: The Laramie County Public Library System was organized in August of 1886.

First National Forest: By an Act signed by President Benjamin Harrison in 1891, Shoshone National Forest became the first national forest. Wyoming now has 9 national forests.

First Ranger Station: Wapiti Ranger Station was established in the Shoshone National Forest in 1891.

First National Monument: Devils Tower in northeastern Wyoming was designated the first national monument by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1906.

First Artificially Lit Evening Football Game: The first interscholastic football game to be played under artificial light took place in Midwest, Wyoming in 1925.

We still have quite a ways to go when it comes to becoming the Equality State in full though. Every year, we have to beat back bills limiting reproductive rights and attacking the rights of the GLBTQ community. It’s in the spirit of a state that had the first female governor, and that pragmatically granted women the right to vote to gain statehood, that we continue to fight. 

Filed under Wyoming Nellie Tayloe Ross The Equality State politics news equality firsts

116 notes

motherjones:

Conservative culture warrior explains “How to talk about same-sex marriage at Thanksgiving.”

Take note, Tumblrs. Three easy steps! Remember step three: If you take issue with the Turkey Day proselytizing of your 700 Club-watching great aunt, you’re being intolerant. So start being more tolerant of marriage fundamentalists and shut up. Amirite???

Oh jeebus… I can’t even… 

Filed under gay marriage lgbt equality video thanksgiving family arguments wtf stfu conservatives

217 notes

bacon-beer-and-boobs replied to your post: BREAKING: Senate Judiciary Committee passes the…

I’m sorry, but I don’t know what DOMA is. Could you please enlighten me?

It’s the Defense of Marriage Act. DOMA is a federal act that bars recognition of same-sex marriages at the federal level, regardless of state law.

For example, a Massachusetts couple can file taxes as married at the state level in Massachusetts. However, they must file their federal taxes as single. There’s over 1100 rights that come with recognition of a marriage. DOMA deprives same-sex couples of those rights when they enter into a legal marriage in their jurisdiction. 

Filed under reply bacon-beer-and-boobs DOMA equality explanation

41 notes

slperspective asked: Meg,

I’ve noticed that you refer to equality quite often in yourdiscussions. Often referring to the Wyoming State motto of “The Equality State”inferring that equality is non-existent in Wyoming. Could you help meunderstand exactly what you mean when you say “equality”?

Thanks,
Marc

Marc,

Not everything is black or white. Never have I implied equality is completely non-existent. If you’ve been paying attention over the past few years, you’d understand what I mean. However, I’m feeling generous. 

First, let’s start with Dictionary.com's definition of equality:

e·qual·i·ty [ih-kwol-i-tee]
noun, plural -ties.
1.the state or quality of being equal; correspondence in quantity, degree, value, rank, or ability.

Now with the Wyoming Constitution:

Article 1, Section 2. Equality of all.

In their inherent right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, all members of the human race are equal.

Article 1, Section 3. Equal political rights.

Since equality in the enjoyment of natural and civil rights is only made sure through political equality, the laws of this state affecting the political rights and privileges of its citizens shall be without distinction of race, color, sex, or any circumstance or condition whatsoever other than individual incompetency, or unworthiness duly ascertained by a court of competent jurisdiction.

So equality in Wyoming is really for all people. And by all people, Marc, that means folks you and your BFFs may find distasteful. Every other legislative session, I go over the hill to testify against bills seeking to marginalize and discriminate against GLBTQ people in Wyoming. Bills you all testify in favor of regularly. I’ve heard my friends called diseased, broken, and sick - in a legislative committee! And don’t give me any of this “hate the sin, love the sinner” stuff. Even if you believe that, you are still hating one very core piece of an individual. If homosexuality is a choice, when did you wake up and choose to be straight? Could you, personally, choose to be gay? Doubt it.

I honestly don’t care that you folks believe America is a Judeo-Christian nation. That’s all well and good. However, when you start legislating from a religious book, that’s called a theocracy. Iran does it too. The Bible teaches valid moral lessons. So do many other religious books. I used to be Catholic. I’m now an atheist. My moral foundation did not change. Even without God, I still believe it’s wrong to kill people, steal, lie, etc. 

From one of your articles:

"Gay couples are not lined up at city halls hoping for a marriage license… I have never believed that gays wanted to marry. Their behavior by its very nature is too promiscuous… Gay relationships are for the most part sexually open rather than exclusive… Gays are actively trying to destroy marriage and will take away our freedom of speech and religion in order to do it."

Here’s a photo of couples lined up at the Albany County Courthouse last Valentine’s Day to receive a marriage license:

So straight couples can enter into a 72-day marriage with a $10 mil. wedding a la Kim Kardashian, then seek a divorce, and God somehow is more cool with that than with any of these couples above getting married. Just for the record, my husband and I have been married for roughly 2.11 Kardashians.

Know what? Let Mrs. Betty Bowers break down “Traditional Marriage” for you:

Another quote from your articles:

Study after study has shown that gay “marriage” undermines the institution of marriage. In those societies where homosexual “marriage” has been tried, traditional marriage is increasingly discarded.

Citation needed. I want a peer-reviewed study endorsed by AMA, APA, or ASA. It’s okay, I’ll wait. Here’s Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn. dealing with one cited by conservatives often:

Funny that. So there’s no difference between same-sex and opposite-sex families? 

I also enjoy that you use “Well, there’s not that many of them” as a justification. You’ve claimed roughly 1.7% of the population is homosexual. So what? Does that justify discrimination? 0.8% of the population is American Indian. Does their low number justify discrimination?

How, personally, has marriage equality kept you from enjoying your heterosexual marriage? If you want to see more of my thoughts, read these two letters.

A Modest Proposal
Same-Sex Bill Same as Past Discriminatory Laws in America

If marriage equality passes in Wyoming, your church can still refuse to marry same-sex couples, much like a Catholic church can refuse to marry Baptists or those who don’t want to complete their pre-marital counseling.

Further, the opposition to marriage equality keeps boiling it down to sex and procreation. Is that all marriage is to you folks? Pumping out kids and occasionally sweating up the sheets? I see it as legitimization of a committed, loving relationship entered into by two consenting adults. Trust me, straight people can engage in some freaky, non-procreative sexual activity. 

P.S. And about consent - marriage equality is not going to lead to bestiality or marrying brothers and sisters. Your cat cannot consent to a legal contract and legal precedent has validated the state’s interest in preventing close blood relatives from marrying - though there’s more states where you can marry first cousin than your same-sex partner. Any closer than that, and the courts have said no bueno. Supposedly, marriage between the races would lead to the same outcomes. Didn’t happen, but it’s just like how expanding voting rights led to hamsters voting, right? Slippery slope, y’know?

And railing about free speech and freedom of religion - no one is going to stop you from proclaiming gay people are ruining America. No one is going to force you to stop believing your chosen brand of Christianity.

Still with me?

As for gender equality, we’re somehow the equality state, yet my salary is likely to be 67% of a man’s for the same work. I deal regularly in my activism with people like yourself who want to regulate when I can bear children or my choice to not be pregnant - to not bring an unwanted child into the world. Or my choice to use reproductive services period, as evidenced by the nationwide fervor to defund Planned Parenthood. 

So in summary, my vision of equality is a state (and a nation) where this debate is unnecessary because full equality for all exists.

I envision a state where my friends don’t have to spend thousands of dollars drawing up legal documents to make sure assets are protected in death. A state where, when I travel over the hill, I don’t hear my friends’ relationships reduced to sex acts, described in disgusting unreality simply to degrade them to a category somehow less than you. A state where my friends cannot be fired from their jobs simply for being gay. A state where their relationships can be acknowledged as marriage. A state where gay or straight doesn’t matter, because under the law, everyone has the same political rights regardless of sexual orientation. A state where, if I do the same work as a man, I don’t have to hope I’m getting paid in a similar fashion. A state where my uterus is none of your business. Somehow, shrinking government entails making it just small enough to fit in my uterus. 

Is that all pretty clear?

Cheers,
Meg 

Filed under slperspective ask ask box equality Wyoming same-sex marriage marriage equality conservative conservatives GLBTQ politics

26 notes

My friend Will Welch received this in the mail from UniWyo Federal Credit Union. It’s a laminated newspaper clipping of him, my husband Andrew, and other equality activists marching with GetEqual WY for equal rights for GLBTQ people on the day Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell was repealed. 
The enclosed note reads:

"Will,
Thanks for all you do in our community. Keep up the good work!
Your Friends at UniWyo FCU”

Will wrote that UniWyo did the same thing on Valentines day. He said, “They sent me a laminated copy of the picture in the paper with a note saying, ‘We thought you might like to have this as a keepsake.’ It’s stuck in the frame of a painting in my livingroom with the note. It’s a picture of me and Alex dressed up holding our flowers asking for marriage licenses at the courthouse.”
And this, my friends, is yet another reason to move your money to an institution that gives a damn about the community. For more information on how do that, since Move Your Money day is tomorrow, visit the Move Your Money Project.

My friend Will Welch received this in the mail from UniWyo Federal Credit Union. It’s a laminated newspaper clipping of him, my husband Andrew, and other equality activists marching with GetEqual WY for equal rights for GLBTQ people on the day Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell was repealed. 

The enclosed note reads:

"Will,

Thanks for all you do in our community. Keep up the good work!

Your Friends at UniWyo FCU”

Will wrote that UniWyo did the same thing on Valentines day. He said, “They sent me a laminated copy of the picture in the paper with a note saying, ‘We thought you might like to have this as a keepsake.’ It’s stuck in the frame of a painting in my livingroom with the note. It’s a picture of me and Alex dressed up holding our flowers asking for marriage licenses at the courthouse.”

And this, my friends, is yet another reason to move your money to an institution that gives a damn about the community. For more information on how do that, since Move Your Money day is tomorrow, visit the Move Your Money Project.

Filed under Will Welch Move Your Money GetEqual WY politics protest UniWyo Federal Credit Union Wyoming economy credit union awesome Laramie equality GLBTQ