Cognitive Dissonance

"Democracy! Bah! When I hear that I reach for my feather boa!" - Allen Ginsberg

Posts tagged justice

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Florida Gov. Rick Scott delays execution for Attorney General Pam Bondi’s fundraiser | The Raw Story

Mind you, this is a woman who is currently fighting to speed up executions in Florida. Except for when she needs to raise funds, of course. Then Marshall Lee Gore can wait.

Phyllis Novick, the mother of one of the women murdered by Gore, speaks for many of us when she questioned the priorities of the elected officials in Florida, saying, “What’s going on down there? It’s ridiculous.”

Indeed. What the hell, Florida?

Filed under Rick Scott Pam Bondi Republican Politics News Death Penalty Marshall Lee Gore Crime Justice Injustice Florida What the hell Florida?

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Hundreds rally for judge's resignation and judicial review

By noon, the crowd was already pushing 300.

Once the rally began 15 minutes later, nearly 400 people — neighbors and friends, activists, members of the national media and the mother of rape victim Cherice Moralez — watched, cheered, shouted, waved protest signs and called for the resignation of District Court Judge G. Todd Baugh…

On Monday Baugh sentenced former Senior High teacher Stacey Rambold — who pleaded guilty to raping Cherice Moralez, one of his 14-year-old students — to serve 31 days in jail. He received credit for one day already served.

Baugh explained the sentence by saying the victim was “older than her chronological age” and said she had some control over her relationship with the teacher…

Moralez was 14 when she was raped by Rambold. The girl killed herself weeks before her 17th birthday as her sexual relationship with Rambold became a criminal case. Under state law, children younger than 16 cannot consent to sexual intercourse, which makes Rambold’s crime felony rape.

Yellowstone County Attorney Scott Twito said he disagrees with the sentence, and that his office has contacted the appellate division of the Montana State Attorney General’s office.

The judge’s justifications of she’s “older than her chronological age” and that the victim is in control are disgusting, and used by child rapists frequently.  She was not in control. Rambold was in a position of authority over her, and he abused that power — not to mention the public trust. Baugh should do the right thing and step down. NOW.

It’s heartening to see Montana folks and others stepping up and demanding justice.

Filed under Rape politics justice injustice G. Todd Baugh Cherice Moralez Montana tw: rape sexual violence rape culture law lawblr Stacey Rambold

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I Hereby Resign in Protest Effective Immediately

This piece, written by a former soldier and military defense contractor, is incredibly powerful. I encourage everyone to read it. Here’s an excerpt:

"I hereby resign in protest effective immediately. I have served the post-911 Military Industrial complex for 10 years, first as a soldier in Baghdad, and now as a defense contractor.

At the time of my enlistment, I believed in the cause. I was ignorant, naïve, and misled. The narrative, professed by the state, and echoed by the mainstream press, has proven false and criminal. We have become what I thought we were fighting against.” — Brandon Toy

Filed under Brandon Toy War Politics military military industrial complex justice Iraq Afghanistan

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STATE OF FLORIDA
VS.
GEORGE ZIMMERMAN

COUNT 1: IN THE COUNTY OF SEMINOLE, STATE OF FLORIDA, on February 26, 2012, GEORGE ZIMMERMAN, did unlawfully and by an act imminently dangerous to another, and evincing a depraved mind regardless of human life, although without any premeditated design to effect the death of any particular individual, kill TRAYVON MARTIN, a human being under the age of eighteen, by shooting the said victim, and during the commission of the aforementioned Second Degree Murder, the said GEORGE ZIMMERMAN did carry, display, use, threaten to use or attempt to use a firearm and did actually possess and discharge a firearm and as a result of the discharge, death or great bodily harm was inflicted upon any person, contrary to the provisions of Section 782.04(2), 775.087(1) and 775.087(2), Florida Statutes.

ANGELA B. COREY
STATE ATTORNEY

From the issue capias filed by Special Prosecutor Angela Corey charging George Zimmerman with second degree murder.

It’s affirming to see it.

(Source: cognitivedissonance)

Filed under George Zimmerman Trayvon Martin justice crime justice for Trayvon Angela Corey Florida murder news

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We did not come to this decision lightly. We do not prosecute by public pressure or by petition; we prosecute by the facts of any given case as well as the laws of Florida… It is the search for justice for Trayvon that has brought us to this moment. We are not only ministers of justice, we are seekers of truth. Again, we prosecute on facts, not public pressure. We will continue to seek the truth throughout this case… Today, we filed an information charging George Zimmerman with second degree murder.
Special Prosecutor Angela Corey, disclosing George Zimmerman is charged with second degree murder.

(Source: cognitivedissonance)

Filed under Angela Corey Trayvon Martin George Zimmerman justice murder crime Florida Sanford injustice shooting

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Gay and lesbian military personnel sue US government

A group of married gay current and former military personnel sued the US government on Thursday, seeking equal recognition, benefits and the same support as married heterosexual couples who serve in the military.

The lawsuit filed in US district court in Boston says the government’s defence of marriage act violates their constitutional rights and asks the military to recognise their legal marriages.

"This case is about one thing, plain and simple," said Aubrey Sarvis, executive director of the Servicemembers Legal Defense Network, which filed the suit. "It’s about justice for gay and lesbian service members and their families in our armed forces rendering the same military service, making the same sacrifices, and taking the same risks to keep our nation secure at home and abroad."

I knew it was a matter of time before US military members filed a challenge. The benefits awarded to spouses are quite far-reaching, and have legal implications. For example, if a gay U.S. Marine is killed in combat, under federal law, his husband is not his next of kin, cannot receive his body or any of the death benefits with which to bury him. He cannot have his spouse’s GI Bill benefits passed on to him. This is an excellent case to overturn DOMA. Let’s hope it succeeds. 

Filed under DOMA US Military government politics same-sex marriage Defense of Marriage Act marriage equality equal rights justice military GLBTQ

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This is America.
Update:
mohandasgandhi said: This was shown to be inaccurate. According to the NY Times, Paul Allen was up for LIFE in prison and Roy Brown pretended he had a gun, thus the higher sentence.
Ultimately, federal prosecutors sought 6 years versus a life term for Allen. The New York Times article cited on Reddit doesn’t even mention Allen as being up for a life term. That was the mastermind of the scheme, Lee Farkas. Here’s Allen’s plea agreement.
Roy Brown exhibited remorse and gave back what he stole. The feds have been unable to locate most of the assets stolen by Allen and his co-conspirators.
Did Brown commit a crime? Yes. But why is a man who steals $3 billion somehow worthier of a lesser sentence? Where was the greater harm?
Here’s why Roy Brown says he committed his crime:

A man who said he robbed a downtown Shreveport bank because he was out of a job and hungry has been sentenced to 15 years in prison for first-degree robbery.

Here’s what the US Justice Department said about Allen:

Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer, head of the Justice Department’s criminal division, said in an e-mailed statement, “Today’s sentence sends a strong message that corporate fraud by senior executives will not be tolerated.” Sean Ragland, 37, a former senior financial analyst at Taylor Bean who also pleaded guilty to the fraud, was sentenced today to three months in prison.

I do get your point. But I feel Paul Allen and his ilk caused much greater harm than Roy Brown ever will.

Some men rob you with a six-gun, others rob you with a fountain pen. - Woody Guthrie

This is America.

Update:

mohandasgandhi said: This was shown to be inaccurate. According to the NY Times, Paul Allen was up for LIFE in prison and Roy Brown pretended he had a gun, thus the higher sentence.

Ultimately, federal prosecutors sought 6 years versus a life term for Allen. The New York Times article cited on Reddit doesn’t even mention Allen as being up for a life term. That was the mastermind of the scheme, Lee Farkas. Here’s Allen’s plea agreement.

Roy Brown exhibited remorse and gave back what he stole. The feds have been unable to locate most of the assets stolen by Allen and his co-conspirators.

Did Brown commit a crime? Yes. But why is a man who steals $3 billion somehow worthier of a lesser sentence? Where was the greater harm?

Here’s why Roy Brown says he committed his crime:

A man who said he robbed a downtown Shreveport bank because he was out of a job and hungry has been sentenced to 15 years in prison for first-degree robbery.

Here’s what the US Justice Department said about Allen:

Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer, head of the Justice Department’s criminal division, said in an e-mailed statement, “Today’s sentence sends a strong message that corporate fraud by senior executives will not be tolerated.” Sean Ragland, 37, a former senior financial analyst at Taylor Bean who also pleaded guilty to the fraud, was sentenced today to three months in prison.

I do get your point. But I feel Paul Allen and his ilk caused much greater harm than Roy Brown ever will.

Some men rob you with a six-gun, others rob you with a fountain pen. - Woody Guthrie

Filed under inequality Injustice america politics crime criminal injustice system white collar justice white collar crime exploitation

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Private Prisons Found to Offer Little in Savings

The conviction that private prisons save money helped drive more than 30 states to turn to them for housing inmates. But Arizona shows that popular wisdom might be wrong: Data there suggest that privately operated prisons can cost more to operate than state-run prisons — even though they often steer clear of the sickest, costliest inmates.  

The state’s experience has particular relevance now, as many politicians have promised to ease budget problems by trimming state agencies. Florida and Ohio are planning major shifts toward private prisons, and Arizona is expected to sign deals doubling its private-inmate population.

The measures would be a shot in the arm for an industry that has struggled, in some places, to fill prison beds as the number of inmates nationwide has leveled off. But hopes of big taxpayer benefits might end in disappointment, independent experts say.

Isn’t it a good thing if prison beds aren’t filled? Wait… not if you’re in it for profit! Hence why privatizing something that should never be a for-profit industry was a bad thing.

Filed under justice politics privatization prisons

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A union member, a tea partier, and a CEO are sitting at a table. In the middle of the table is a plate with a dozen cookies on it. The CEO reaches across and takes 11 cookies, looks at the tea partier and says, “Watch out for that union guy, he wants a piece of your cookie.”

Laughing keeps me from screaming.

Filed under Democracy Scott Imperial Walker Union Wisconsin freedom justice scott walker union-busting worker's rights Tea Party Teabagger teabaggery STFU GOP

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as you read about the trial of Brisenia Flores’s murderers…

radicallyhottoff:

Please note how rarely MSM is calling her murderers white supremacists and how rarely the organization they are a part of is called a hate group. Notice how key phrases like “hotly contested issue” keep coming up as code words for “white supremacist violence.” Notice how the Minutemen are never called a terrorist organization.

Notice how Brisenia is always mentioned in context of the little white girl shot during the Giffords shooting—as if Brisenia only became important and a tragedy *after* a white girl was killed. As if the only thing that could help us to understand the tragedy of Brisenia is first understanding a tragedy through a lens of whiteness.

Remember that Brisenia was killed first. And that she was specifically murdered because of the color of her skin. What happened to Brisenia was an act of white supremacist violence.

White supremacy is gendered male—and sees brown children as “anchors” and brown girl children as the next generation of resource drainers. Race IS gender. Citizenship IS gender. Border crossing is a direct threat to white supremacy. This is the truth we miss unless we teach other how to find it. 

Class, race, gender. In violence like this, it’s all intertwined. Brisenia and her father deserve their own justice outside the context of another murder. They got it yesterday.

(via stfuconservatives)

Filed under Brisenia Flores Arizona Shooting murder justice race class gender Arizona Shawna Ford Minutemen