Cognitive Dissonance

"Democracy! Bah! When I hear that I reach for my feather boa!" - Allen Ginsberg

Posts tagged liberals

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'Occupy Wall Street' -- It's Not What They're for, But What They're Against

I’m posting this in full, because I am literally stunned this was posted on Fox News. Emphasis mine:

Critics of the growing Occupy Street movement complain that the protesters don’t have a policy agenda and, therefore, don’t stand for anything. They’re wrong. The key isn’t what protesters are for but rather what they’re against — the gaping inequality that has poisoned our economy, our politics and our nation.

In America today, 400 people have more wealth than the bottom 150 million combined. That’s not because 150 million Americans are pathetically lazy or even unlucky. In fact, Americans have been working harder than ever - productivity has risen in the last several decades. Big business profits and CEO bonuses have also gone up. Worker salaries, however, have declined.Most of the Occupy Wall Street protesters aren’t opposed to free market capitalism. In fact, what they want is an end to the crony capitalist system now in place, that makes it easier for the rich and powerful to get even more rich and powerful while making it increasingly hard for the rest of us to get by.

The protesters are not anti-American radicals. They are the defenders of the American Dream, the decision from the birth of our nation that success should be determined by hard work, not royal bloodlines.

Sure, bank executives may work a lot harder than you and me or a mother of three doing checkout at a grocery store. Maybe the bankers work ten times harder. Maybe even a hundred times harder. But they’re compensated a thousand times more.

The question is not how Occupy Wall Street protesters can find that gross discrepancy immoral. The question is why every one of us isn’t protesting with them.

According to polls, most Americans support the 99% movement, even if they’re not taking to the streets. In fact, support for the Occupy Wall Street protests is not only higher than for either political party in Washington but greater than support for the Tea Party. And unlike the Tea Party which was fueled by national conservative donors and institutions, the Occupy Wall Street Movement is spreading organically from Idaho to Indiana. Institutions on the left, including unions, have been relatively late to the game.

Ironically, the original Boston Tea Party activists would likely support Occupy Wall Street more as well. Note that the original Tea Party didn’t protest taxes, merely the idea of taxation without representation - and they were actually protesting the crown-backed monopoly of the East India Company, the main big business of the day.

Americans today also support taxes. In fact, two-thirds of voters - including a majority of Republicans - support increasing taxes on the rich, something the Occupy Wall Street protests implicitly support. That’s not just anarchist lefty kids. Soccer moms and construction workers and, yes, even some bankers want to see our economy work for the 99%, not just the 1%, and are flocking to Occupy protests in droves.

I’ve even met a number of Libertarians and Tea Party conservatives at these protests. So the critics are right, the Occupy Wall Street movement isn’t the Tea Party. Occupy Wall Street is much, much broader.

Maybe it’s hard to see your best interests reflected in a sometimes rag-tag, inarticulate, imperfect group of protesters. But make no mistake about it: While horrendous inequality is not an American tradition, protest is. And if you’re part of the 99% of underpaid or unemployed Americans crushed in the current economy, the Occupy Wall Street protests are your best chance at fixing the broken economy that is breaking your back.

This is one of the most articulate defenses of Occupy Wall Street I’ve seen, and let me repeat - this is on Fox News. So if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to go pick my jaw up off the floor.

Filed under Fox News Occupy Wall Street politics protest holy shit y'all Occupy Everywhere Occupy Together conservative conservatives liberal liberals inequality economy We are the 99 percent

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Taken just a few moments ago at 8:10 PM (MST). That would be 68% of the vote in favor of “Yes. These folks are right about corporate greed and what’s happening to the little guy.” 
I know this poll was on Tumblr and progressive twitter feeds last night, but folks, this can’t be all us on Fox News… can it? Regardless, keep voting!

Taken just a few moments ago at 8:10 PM (MST). That would be 68% of the vote in favor of “Yes. These folks are right about corporate greed and what’s happening to the little guy.” 

I know this poll was on Tumblr and progressive twitter feeds last night, but folks, this can’t be all us on Fox News… can it? Regardless, keep voting!

Filed under Fox News poll Occupy Wall Street politics conservative conservatives liberal liberals awesome the times they are a-changin'

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After a video of [Elizabeth] Warren talking about the deficit and the social contract went viral last week (see above), Rush Limbaugh, the Fiscal Times and Rich Lowrey all spent time attacking her. Now, Lowrey has decided to spend another column going after her, and places like the Daily Caller and Reason have piled on. There is also this gem from right-wing blog Wizbang:
Picture text: When I hear the word “contract” I reach for my revolver think of two unique definitions — formally, a legally binding mutual agreement made between two or more parties, or idiomatically, an attempt to hire an assassin to kill one or more of your enemies.

I have been half-joking on my radio show for months that, with the way political discourse has degenerated, Mission of Burma’s song “That’s When I Reach For My Revolver” will one day be the Tea Party anthem. Here’s Moby’s version:

Check out the lyrics here. This shit isn’t funny. We just had Andrew Breitbart, sweaty and pacing, fire up a Tea Party crowd by fantasizing about killing liberals. Breitbart said, “They can only win a rhetorical and propaganda war. They cannot win. We outnumber them in this country, and we have the guns. I’m not kidding.” Read the rest of Michael Laprarie’s entry here.
And now, Elizabeth Warren dares to run for U.S. Senate and challenges Scott Brown (someone they don’t even like) and the Wall Street status quo. I’m not going to sit here and pretend that liberal are always civil and conservatives uncivil. Can we simply stop with the veiled (and not-so-veiled) references to killing people? It’s getting really old.

After a video of [Elizabeth] Warren talking about the deficit and the social contract went viral last week (see above), Rush Limbaugh, the Fiscal Times and Rich Lowrey all spent time attacking her. Now, Lowrey has decided to spend another column going after her, and places like the Daily Caller and Reason have piled on. There is also this gem from right-wing blog Wizbang:

Picture text: When I hear the word “contract” I reach for my revolver think of two unique definitions — formally, a legally binding mutual agreement made between two or more parties, or idiomatically, an attempt to hire an assassin to kill one or more of your enemies.

I have been half-joking on my radio show for months that, with the way political discourse has degenerated, Mission of Burma’s song “That’s When I Reach For My Revolver” will one day be the Tea Party anthem. Here’s Moby’s version:

Check out the lyrics here. This shit isn’t funny. We just had Andrew Breitbart, sweaty and pacing, fire up a Tea Party crowd by fantasizing about killing liberals. Breitbart said, “They can only win a rhetorical and propaganda war. They cannot win. We outnumber them in this country, and we have the guns. I’m not kidding.” Read the rest of Michael Laprarie’s entry here.

And now, Elizabeth Warren dares to run for U.S. Senate and challenges Scott Brown (someone they don’t even like) and the Wall Street status quo. I’m not going to sit here and pretend that liberal are always civil and conservatives uncivil. Can we simply stop with the veiled (and not-so-veiled) references to killing people? It’s getting really old.

Filed under Elizabeth Warren politics Conservative conservatives liberal liberals violence rhetoric violent rhetoric Wizbang Right-Wing right-wing violence threats US Senate government

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Last night, Troy Davis was executed in Georgia for the murder of an off duty police officer.

In 1989 Davis shot and killed an off duty police officer, Mark McPhail. He was convicted of capital murder in 1991 and spent the last 20 years on death row. His cause was taken up by liberal celebrities (a pretty good indicator that the jury got it right) as well as the usual suspects… Benjamin Jealous of the NAACP tweeted, “In death, Troy Davis will live on as a reminder of a broken justice system that kills an innocent man while a murderer walks free.”

A broken system? Only a far left activist can get paid to make such idiotic statements.

Judson Phillips, head of Tea Party Nation, on the execution lynching of Troy Davis. This man has claimed to be a former prosecutor, which sends chills up my spine when he writes liberals championing Davis’ cause means the jury got it right. It doesn’t matter that members of the jury who convicted Davis said if they knew what they know now, they would have voted for acquittal.

There’s a few people in the comments disagreeing with him, and for their dissent, they’re roundly condemned as “closet leftists” and the like.

Phillips claims to be pro-life all over the site. Pro-life my ass. All he does in the rest of the post is whine about how much it costs the state to kill someone and how long it takes. Phillips suggests speeding it up, writing, “Perhaps the question we should be asking is why does it take twenty years and an untold amount of taxpayer money for justice to be delivered?”

No. We should be asking how this happened in America and how we’re one of the last industrialized countries with capital punishment. We will pay billions in taxpayer dollars to kill someone (more expensive than life imprisonment) but GOD FORBID we suggest spending one cent to take care of others in any way.

As an ex-prosecutor, Phillips should know the dangers of eyewitness evidence instead of simply dismissing it. Further, he knows that the appeals process is constitutionally upheld. He’s simply callous.

(Source: teapartynation.com)

Filed under Judson Phillips Tea Party Nation Troy Davis callous injustice capital punishment death penalty Ben Jealous NAACP liberals Tea Party conservative conservatives