Cognitive Dissonance

"Democracy! Bah! When I hear that I reach for my feather boa!" - Allen Ginsberg

Posts tagged misogyny

81 notes

This is what I get in reply to answering this ask.
No, actually YOU’RE everything that is destroying America. Classism, racism, violent misogyny, all in one quite angry, hate-filled package. 
Guess what? I regret nothing about doing what I have to stay healthy, even if it means accepting benefits from a system we all pay into. 
And like the slime you are, you’ve already oozed back into whatever hellhole birthed you, and deleted your tumblr. No worries. I jacked the URL, just in case it had some kind of special meaning for you. It’s now a private blog called “Land Scum”. Think of a new URL, and I’ll still be here when you resurface. 
Cheers!

This is what I get in reply to answering this ask.

No, actually YOU’RE everything that is destroying America. Classism, racism, violent misogyny, all in one quite angry, hate-filled package. 

Guess what? I regret nothing about doing what I have to stay healthy, even if it means accepting benefits from a system we all pay into. 

And like the slime you are, you’ve already oozed back into whatever hellhole birthed you, and deleted your tumblr. No worries. I jacked the URL, just in case it had some kind of special meaning for you. It’s now a private blog called “Land Scum”. Think of a new URL, and I’ll still be here when you resurface. 

Cheers!

Filed under tw: racism tw: suicide tw: hate tw: misogyny hate misogyny misogynist this is why we can't have nice things

77 notes

Meet the Wendy Davis truthers

"The Texas lawmaker looks a little different than she did 30 years ago, and one anonymous blog wants to know why"

So this is a thing.

The anonymous blogger’s claims include she can’t be a feminist icon because she wears makeup and dresses, plus “[c]urrent photos of Senator Davis depict someone who is not just more physically attractive, but who arguably seems younger than the woman in her yearbook photo, even though that photo was taken 22 years ago.”

I just… REALLY?!

Filed under Wendy Davis Sexism Misogyny politics conspiracy theory Texas I can't i mean really

139 notes

Rape threats happen. Death threats happen. People threaten friends, families, jobs, household pets. Stalkers go to considerable lengths to collect and exploit information. People who are open about this, who do talk about threats and stalking and danger, and they are out there, are punished for it. They get more abuse, they’re told that they’re making it all up, that it’s all in their heads, that they are exaggerating, entirely new hate sites spring up to speculate about them and talk about their ‘desperate ploys for attention.’ That’s what I have to look forward to for writing this piece, for laying out some of the costs of social participation for you, for openly discussing the thing which dare not speak its name, the brash, open hostility reserved for people who do not shut up.

This is a reality, and it doesn’t go away if we don’t talk about it.

S.E. Smith, "On Blogging, Threats, and Silence" 

If we don’t talk about it, it doesn’t go away. It just finds another target.

So yeah…

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Filed under trolling rape culture silence Silence is complicity feminism misogyny racism fear hate

79 notes

Anonymous asked: I have a question. I never liked rap until I heard Macklemore. And I listened to some other stuff, and so the only rap I like is by white people. I wrote an informative persuasion speech for my Public Speaking class about how black people started rap but white people made it better because it's not all gangster. I got docked for points because my teacher (a black prof) said it was racist, that it's in the syllabus hate speech won't be tolerated, and it's not a persuasion speech. Who's right?

You are definitely in the wrong here. So. Very. Wrong.

Your opinion is just that — an opinion. If you’re doing an informative persuasion speech, I’m going to guess your professor wanted you to cite sources. I don’t even know what sources you’d cite to suggest that white people were able to take rap and make it better because it’s not “all gangster.” I’m gonna guess Stormfront. It was Stormfront, right?

And that leads to the whole racism thing…

Yes, your professor is right. Let me quote another white rapper, Eminem, as our starting point:

“I am the worst thing since Elvis Presley / to do Black Music so selfishly / and use it to get myself wealthy (Hey) / there’s a concept that works” — “Without Me”

There’s a long history of cultural appropriation with Black music and culture, whether it’s rap, blues, rock n’ roll, etc. (Harlem Shake anyone?) What do you think birthed rock n’ roll? It just fell out of the sky like manna from White Jesus? Bullshit. I encourage you to pick up this book, The Soul of Rock ‘N Roll: A History of African Americans in Rock Music.

Now, on to rap. First off, I’ll help you with the whole hip hop white people like thing. Brian over at Cats and Beer complied a list of hip hop songs for white people and damn, if it isn’t the truth from what I’ve seen with white people who say, “Oh yeah, I LOVE rap!”

In all seriousness, examine what you’re saying up there. You like rap that white people have done because it’s “not all gangster” — did you stop to consider that perhaps the music you hear from people of color has something to do with their real-life and their struggles? Yeah, there’s gangsta rap, but check your privilege at the door anon — I’m guessing your objections don’t come from growing up in and seeing that as a part of everyday life.

However, some rap and hip hop IS problematic itself with the derogatory language towards women, LGBTQ people, and Black women in particular, but there’s also the same degradation in rock music — largely by white men, and for decades. On my radio show, we came to the conclusion that Death Cab for Cutie’s, “I Will Posses Your Heart” is the ultimate “nice guy” song:

“You reject my advances and desperate pleas / I won’t let you let me down so easily / So easily”

Let me? How sweet of you Ben Gibbard, let me have hundred of your twee lil’ babies!

Dr. Edward Rhymes wrote an excellent piece about rap being scapegoated by the dominant culture in America called “Caucasian please! America’s Cultural Double Standard for Misogyny and Racism.” An excerpt:

In this composition I will not be addressing the whole of hip-hop and rap, but rather hardcore and gangsta rap. It is my assertion that the mainstream media and political pundits — right and left — have painted rap and hip-hop with a very broad brush. Let me be perfectly clear, hardcore and gangsta rap is not listened to, watched, consumed or supported in my home and never has been. I will not be an apologist for anything that chooses to frame the dialogue about Black women (and women in general) and Black life in morally bankrupt language and reprehensible symbols.

In the wake of MSNBC’s and CBS’s firing of Don Imus, the debate over misogyny, sexism and racism has now taken flight — or submerged, depending on your point of view. There are many, mostly white, people who believe that Imus was a fall guy and he is receiving blame and criticism for what many rap artists do continually in the lyrics and videos: debase and degrade Black women. A Black guest on an MSNBC news program even went as far as to say, “Where would a 66 year-old white guy even had heard the phrase nappy-headed ho” — alluding to hip-hop music’s perceived powerful influence upon American culture and life (and apparently over the radio legend as well) — and by so doing gave a veneer of truth to the theory that rap music is the main culprit to be blamed for this contemporary brand of chauvinism.

However, I concur with bell hooks, the noted sociologist and black-feminist activist who said that “to see gangsta rap as a reflection of dominant values in our culture rather than as an aberrant ‘pathological’ standpoint, does not mean that a rigorous feminist critique of the sexist and misogyny expressed in this music is not needed. Without a doubt black males, young and old, must be held politically accountable for their sexism.

Yet this critique must always be contextualized or we risk making it appear that the behavior this thinking supports and condones — rape, male violence against women, etc. — is a black male thing. And this is what is happening. Young black males are forced to take the ‘heat’ for encouraging, via their music, the hatred of and violence against women that is a central core of patriarchy.”

How about that for an informative persuasion speech?

Not liking rap isn’t racist. I dig Macklemore — “Same Love” and “Thrift Shop” are catchy as hell. Saying the only rap you like is by certain artists who are white, well, it’s awkwardly walking a fine line and some people will assume you’re racist. Claiming white people took rap and made it better? Fuck, anon, you should be grateful you just got points taken off. You assume that rap by people of color is just gangster? Yeah, that’s racist but sadly, I bet there are a few in your class that agree with you. Again, your professor is right. It wasn’t a persuasion speech. It was (likely) racist. I say likely because I obviously didn’t hear it, but I seriously can’t think of a way in which it wouldn’t be racist.

And lest you think all rap by white artists is a-OK, please, let me remind of 3OH!3’s “Don’t Trust Me” — which holds the honor of being the only song I have ever refused to play as a request on my own radio show.

In conclusion, check out Sarah Jones, “Your Revolution”:

Hopefully you’ve learned something here, and your next speech is just a simple how-to instructional speech. May I suggest how not to be an ignorant tool as the topic? Re-read the above if you have any questions.

Class dismissed.

Cheers,

Meg

Filed under anon ask racism cultural appropriation misogynist misogyny

143 notes

Yeah…



So all your MRA creys can go here —> Men’s Sexual Health Services at Planned Parenthood
Ideally, decisions about abortion are made between two people who come to a consensus. However, in an ideal world, communism works. Until people who can get pregnant includes EVERYONE, individuals don’t get to force pregnancy upon their partners. Because that’s what I’m guessing the Jezebel commenter above is SO MADFACED about.
Fun Horrible fact: In 31 states, rapists can sue for visitation rights. Also, abusers often use forced pregnancy as a tool to keep their partners with them, going so far as to sabotage birth control. And let’s be clear, NO ONE is seriously trying to pass laws to prevent men from having control over their reproductive organs. No one is stopping men from refusing to have sex without a condom, bringing their own, insisting on using birth control in general — and hey, the male birth control pill is on the horizon!
It’s important not to conflate men’s reproductive rights with pregnancy versus parenthood. While there’s a significant discussion to be had about men’s rights in regards to custody and visitation, it’s also important to remember a man’s right to parenthood (or to terminate parental rights/give the child up for adoption) begin once we’re talking about a living, breathing child — not a fetus in utero.
Also, while it may take two to traditionally tango, only one is pregnant. Let’s keep in mind that an abortion can take place even if the person seeking an abortion wants to be a parent one day — just not that day, for whatever reason. A man may want to be a father one day, too. But until he is able to undertake the physical and legal burden of fatherhood in the same way as motherhood, the person who is pregnant has the ultimate decision. 
Bonus reading: The Fetal Focus Fallacy

Yeah…

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So all your MRA creys can go here —> Men’s Sexual Health Services at Planned Parenthood

Ideally, decisions about abortion are made between two people who come to a consensus. However, in an ideal world, communism works. Until people who can get pregnant includes EVERYONE, individuals don’t get to force pregnancy upon their partners. Because that’s what I’m guessing the Jezebel commenter above is SO MADFACED about.

Fun Horrible fact: In 31 states, rapists can sue for visitation rights. Also, abusers often use forced pregnancy as a tool to keep their partners with them, going so far as to sabotage birth control. And let’s be clear, NO ONE is seriously trying to pass laws to prevent men from having control over their reproductive organs. No one is stopping men from refusing to have sex without a condom, bringing their own, insisting on using birth control in general — and hey, the male birth control pill is on the horizon!

It’s important not to conflate men’s reproductive rights with pregnancy versus parenthood. While there’s a significant discussion to be had about men’s rights in regards to custody and visitation, it’s also important to remember a man’s right to parenthood (or to terminate parental rights/give the child up for adoption) begin once we’re talking about a living, breathing child — not a fetus in utero.

Also, while it may take two to traditionally tango, only one is pregnant. Let’s keep in mind that an abortion can take place even if the person seeking an abortion wants to be a parent one day — just not that day, for whatever reason. A man may want to be a father one day, too. But until he is able to undertake the physical and legal burden of fatherhood in the same way as motherhood, the person who is pregnant has the ultimate decision. 

Bonus reading: The Fetal Focus Fallacy

Filed under MRA pregnancy reproductive rights politics policy law forced pregnancy gender sexual health misogyny

538 notes

On Anne Hathaway and Upskirt Pics: The “she was asking for it” crowd

I knew it was inevitable. There would be people out there claiming that if Anne Hathaway hadn’t, I don’t know, had a ladyflower or something, some poor paparazzo wouldn’t have had to take a picture of it to sell at a profit. Now, these folks will claim it’s not OK to take pictures of people’s genitals without their consent, but….

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…Anne Hathaway totally brought it on herself by not wearing underwear, getting out of the car properly, taking personal responsibility, wearing a chastity belt, being a woman, being famous, being a famous woman, etc. so therefore, I’m hitting the Google for some upskirt. Or at the very least, defending the creeper photogs making a killing off of Anne Hathaway’s blurry crotch pics. 

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Seriously. There’s laws against upskirt photos in several states (including New York), and the federal Video Voyeurism Act of 2004, but what it typically comes down to legally is whether or not the person had an expectation of privacy, if special equipment (i.e. a bathroom camera) was used to get the shot, and whether or not the image is of bare body parts most people consider the bathing suit area. Unsuprisingly, there’s no “fair game” clause for famous folks who get out of cars awkwardly in any of these laws.

The “she totally asked for it” attitude goes beyond legal ramifications — there’s a dark undercurrent of institutionalized misogyny and rape culture here. If Paris Hilton were raped by an acquaintance after a night of partying in NYC with drugs and booze, there would probably be more internet schadenfreude than if it happened to a stereotypical sorority girl from NYU. Both are terrible events, both would elicit the “she was asking for it” trope, but Paris Hilton would be raked through the coals because of who she is — I mean, SHE MADE A SEX TAPE AND IT WAS RELEASED PUBLICLY, DUH. </sarcasm>

Here’s another example. A substitute teacher in Georgia was fired this year after posting upskirt photos of his allegedly 18-year-old students to the r/creepshots Reddit. In a few threads, he admits the students were younger than 18. Redditors came to his defense, arguing that the girls were asking for it by sitting at their desks with their legs slightly apart in skirts, or by simply dressing sexy. You get the idea. That’s an outrage, right?

This week Anne Hathaway, while in NYC for a movie premiere, got out of a car and accidentally exposed her lack of underwear. As she explained to Matt Lauer (who hilariously boorishly quipped, “We’ve seen a lot of you lately”) the incident “kind of made me sad that we live in an age when someone takes a pic of you in a vulnerable moment and sells it rather than deletes it.” She added, “I’m sorry that we live in a culture that commodifies unwilling participants…”

"Unwilling" being the key word there. Both Hathaway and the teacher’s students were unwilling participants. As Erin Gloria Ryan wrote regarding the educator:

"Because when women turn 18, they magically become public property to be photographed whenever and jerked off to by whomever. Hey, it’s not dudes’ faults your existence drives them into a penile frenzy… there’s also, you know, the fact that we over-18 human females also don’t much appreciate being treated like decorative sex toys. Women’s bodies are not public domain, and demanding control over our images isn’t ‘ruining anyone’s fun.’ It’s asking to be treated like a goddamn person."

Exactly. This idea that women’s bodies are in the public domain runs rampant once a famous woman is involved. Don’t believe me? Just Google any famous female celebrity and “upskirt” — you’re likely to get at least a few hits. I would argue that not respecting the right of female celebrities to avoid being commodified as unwilling sexual objects for profit desensitizes us to sexual violations and objectification of all female persons, whether for profit in a capitalist manner (paparazzi, gossip sites, and tabloid publishing) or for the sexual gratification of Reddit denizens seeking to jerk off to a non-consenting target. 

(Note: Before any of you folks get the bright idea to say “but wimmenz is nekkid in movies all teh time!” remember, the operative word is “unwilling.” Actors and actresses are compensated for nude scenes, are often not actually nude, and have arguably more control over what is ultimately distributed and exposed. They’re willing participants. It’s the difference between Anne Hathaway in NYC this week and Anne Hathaway in the 2010 flick Love and Other Drugs [Link NSFW]. Or, alternately, just because I’ve consented to sex with guys before doesn’t mean I’m down to fuck every guy who wants it.)

So where does that leave us? Strangely prudish, with an intense desire to almost punish female celebrities with the loss of personal possession of their image and, symbolically, their bodies. It’s not that far away from justifying exploitation to justifying assault. In both cases, “she was asking for it” and “she put herself in that situation” takes the blame off the violator and places it on the person who dared to wear too little clothing, too much makeup, wear sweats, drink, walk home alone, get out of a car, go to school, have a vagina, have breasts, be a female person, etc.

Here’s Exhibit A. Meet Emily Moray. I posted the comment from political cartoonist Matt Bors about ascribing blame where it belongs earlier. Well, Emily thinks it’s mostly Anne Hathaway’s fault because, as she says, “[T]here is a difference between having your labia photographed when you have the expectation of privacy and when you show up to A PUBLICITY EVENT. I’m not saying that the photographer and the publisher did the right thing, but she is also responsible for her actions.” Here’s what happened after that [Click to view larger]:

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Got that? Every actress should know she will be photographed upskirt. And Anne Hathaway absolutely cannot haz that sad she told Matt Lauer she had. Because she should know better. And it continues…

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Exactly how far does “she was asking for it” go? Apparently, far enough that a woman should shut her goddamn mouth if she’s silly enough to think she deserves to go out in public looking like that — especially if she’s any kind of celebrity. </sarcasm> Remember, every time you giggle and share that Huffington Post slideshow with the latest unintentional exposure by a famous woman captured in upskirt or downblouse shots, you’re reinforcing the message to women across the gender spectrum that their bodies are not their own, and they too can be sexual objects commodified for sexual pleasure or profit.

Filed under gender Anne Hathaway commodification entertainment politics feminism Upskirt downblouse law legal celebrity control misogyny rape culture rape objectification women creeper consent sexism capitalism

3,793 notes

Instead of calling the photo of Anne Hathaway’s crotch a ‘mishap’ or ‘wardrobe malfunction’ (as everything I’ve seen about it has), all articles should actually be about the person who snapped the pic and begin with ‘A creepy, despicable photographer was caught violating common decency in a photo they sold for money this week…’

Political cartoonist and professional rabble-rouser Matt Bors on Facebook today.

This is another example of institutionalized misogyny. Instead of people just not taking pictures of a woman’s genitalia because human decency, it’s Anne Hathaway’s fault. Essentially, if she didn’t want a paparazzi to take an upskirt shot, she shouldn’t have put herself in that situation where he could get the shot.

Don’t give me any shit about “she should” either — I had a boob fall out of a wrap dress I thought was pretty modest (and tied tightly). It happens. I’ve seen enough dude ass crack to last a lifetime — does it mean I should photograph it? Put it on the internet? 

Filed under Privacy creepy Anne Hathaway Seriously common decency upskirt disgusting misogyny Matt Bors

680 notes

darkjez:

Sandra Fluke’s Speech Made Republicans Crazy. Which Is Just What the Democrats Want [Slate]

These are some conservatives’ tweets in response to Sandra Fluke’s speech at the Democratic National Convention alongside the first comment I came across on the Slate.com article

Like I said… keep talking.

(via trans-terrific-deactivated20121)

Filed under RNC DNC Democratic National Convent Republican National Convention democrats republicans Sandra Fluke misogyny abortion Twitter politics

658 notes

supersoygrrrl:

abaldwin360:

Conservatives Bash Sandra Fluke’s Convention Speech, Parroting Limbaugh’s Sexist Attacks

Despite the widespread outcry against Rush Limbaugh’s and Bill O’Reilly’s sexist smears against Sandra Fluke earlier this year — when they claimed she was a “slut” who wants the government to pay for her “social life” — other far-right commentators haven’t quite grasped why these types of attacks are offensive. After Fluke took to the stage of the Democratic National Convention last night to articulate the issues at stake in the ongoing War on Women, conservative media took to Twitter to bash her for “whining” about needing free birth control for the activities that go on in her “bedroom”.

read more

All I can say is, keep talking shitheads.

Look at how ANGRY these people are that a woman tried to talk in a place she was shut out from talking in. Jfc.

Yeah, keep talking. You do yourself no favors.

(via trans-terrific-deactivated20121)

Filed under RNC DNC republicans misogyny Twitter politics sexism Sandra Fluke

22 notes

The comments on this CNS “News” article…

I’ve lost most of my faith in humanity. 

If you dare… “Under HHS Rules, Obamacare Caters to Sexually Active Women Who Take Risks

CNS News is Cybercast News Service, and used to be called the Conservative News Service. It’s run by Thurston Howell III L. Brent Bozell III, the nephew of William F. Buckley and was the chief fundraiser for Pat Buchanan’s failed presidential bid. He also helped swift-boat John Kerry in 2004. Charming fellow really.

An example of the comments on this article:

RhettButler1: At this time, we have an administration that spits in the face of average and normal Americans. Instead, this administration promotes the agenda of extreme groups like the far left gays, drug dealers/users, illegals and sluts. If you stand back and look at the situation you see the influence of the Ghetto based morals of Obama and his Chicago thugs. Some of you will slam me for this but you know I’m correct. Just look at what happened in Detroit when the Ghetto base gained control. You cannot deny that no matter what you say or what you do. Political theft and corruption destroys civilization…

bsfurg: If the American had any brains they wouldnt have gotton pregant in the first place and the pills dont cost that much any way.. it was pure lax of taking responsibilty for the women.. so lets just see if thies takes c are of Aborting.. three should be any more abortions now that the Women of the USA have free sex… sorry i meant pills..

Hey, do you guys remember that one time that Jesus saw Mary Magdalene, and she came up to him, and he was all like, “Yea, I say unto you, be gone slut!” Then he and the apostles had this big dinner right before he got killed, and he looked around and said, “For this is one big room, full of bad bitches, and it is good.”

No?

Is my memory flawed? Must be too much CNS News.

Oops.

(Source: cognitivedissonance)

Filed under CNS News Obamacare Affordable Care Act politics L. Brent Bozell III misogyny reproductive rights birth control contraception Conservative

24 notes

I think it depends on the movie. I think there are some movies that depict women in a very positive role, and then some movies that put them in a little bit more of negative role. But by the end of the movie, they show that woman power that I know we all have. Such as the movie Pretty Woman. We had a wonderful, beautiful woman, Julia Roberts, and she was having a rough time, but, you know what, she came out on top and she didn’t let anybody stand in her path.

Miss Ohio Audrey Bolte, in response to pageant Judge Marilu Henner’s question: “Do you think women are depicted in movies and on television in an accurate and positive way? And please give us an example.”

If by coming out on top, you meant literally on top of men for money in what was originally supposed to be a “dark tale” about prostitution, drug addiction, and class in Los Angeles, and by not letting anyone stand in her path, you meant becoming the kept woman of a corporate exec who seduces her via material goods until she’s convinced she’s in love with him, then yes. You’re absolutely wrong about the whole role model thing.

Note to Bolte: Our “woman power” that we all have is not just between our legs. It’s also between our ears. Pretty Woman = not empowering.

I wonder if she’s ever actually seen the movie, or if she’s simply internalized patriarchal messaging to the point where this makes sense. Or both.

Let’s not even touch the Miss USA pageant…

Filed under Feminism Pretty Woman Miss USA woman power Audrey Bolte Ohio media movies women misogyny empowerment patriarchy politics

49 notes

Rush Limbaugh to 14-year-old girl: "This show has no boundaries," you're a "Rush baby" AND "Rush babe"

Just when you thought El Rushbo couldn’t get any creepier… he deems a 14-year-old girl a “Rush baby” and “Rush babe”:

LIMBAUGH: Let’s go to Katie, Island Park, Idaho. Glad you called, great to have you on the program. Hello.

CALLER: Hi, Rush. Yeah, my name is Katie, and I’m 14, and I’m not sure if I qualify to be a Rush baby or a Rush babe. What do you think?

LIMBAUGH: You’re 14?

CALLER: I’m 14.

LIMBAUGH: You’re four— you’re both. You are Rush baby and a Rush babe both. We’ll count you both.

CALLER: All righty.

LIMBAUGH: Have you signed up at our Facebook page?

CALLER: Yes, I just did this morning.

LIMBAUGH: Well, then you’re a Rush babe. That’s it.

CALLER: All righty.

LIMBAUGH: Fourteen. Well, thanks very much, Katie, I appreciate it.

CALLER: Thanks. Thanks, Rush.

LIMBAUGH: See, folks, this program has no boundaries. We have people from all three sexes, we have people from all religions, we have people from all genders, all demographics, all ages. A 14-year-old Rush babe.

Yes, Anderson Cooper. It IS disgusting. Note to Rush, who sounds like he’s practically drooling: Age of consent in New York is 17 and Idaho’s law sets it at 18.

Here’s the Rush Babes FB page. The comments are, well, odd.

Filed under Rush Limbaugh Ew Creepy misogyny politics Rush babes Rush babes for America no just plain wrong